Essays in Appreciation

Paperback | April 1, 1998

byChristopher Ricks

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The successor to the highly-praised collection of Christopher Rickss The Force of Poetry, this collection of critical essays still attends to poets and poetry: to John Donnes farewells to love, George Crabbes constraints, Hardys readings of history, and Robert Lowell as translator of Racine.But other literary worlds are also appreciated in Essays in Appreciation. Drama: Marlowes Doctor Faustus and the plague. History: the Earl of Clarendon and composition. The novel: Jane Austen and mothering. Victorian lives: E. C. Gaskells Charlotte Bronte, Froudes Carlyle, Hallam TennysonsTennyson, and George Eliot and her age. Philosophy: J. L. Austin and his art of allusion. Finally, critical questions: literature and the matter of fact, and literary principles against theory; plus two notes on current critical issuesone on talk of the canon, and the other on Empson and politicalcriticism. literary criticism of an intellectual zestfulness which makes everyone else in the field look half asleep The Spectator Ricks's grasp of literary detail is unequalled he has a microscopic eye for distinguishment of shades of meaning, with their bearings on emotional definition Anyone who has a feeling for literature will enjoy Essays in Appreciation. If you have none, here are good reasons to cultivate it. Times Literary Supplement

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From Our Editors

The successor to Christopher Ricks's The Force of Poetry, this collection of critical essays still attends to poets and poetry: to John Donne's farewells to love, George Crabbe's constraints, Hardy's reading of history, and Robert Lowell as translator of Racine. But other literary worlds are also appreciated in Essays in Appreciation. ...

From the Publisher

The successor to the highly-praised collection of Christopher Rickss The Force of Poetry, this collection of critical essays still attends to poets and poetry: to John Donnes farewells to love, George Crabbes constraints, Hardys readings of history, and Robert Lowell as translator of Racine.But other literary worlds are also appreciate...

Christopher Ricks is Professor of English at Boston University, Massachusetts. He is the author of many books, including Miltons Grand Style, The Force of Poetry, Keats and Embarrassment, and Becketts Dying Words, and has edited The New Oxford Book of Victorian Verse.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:368 pages, 7.72 × 5.08 × 0.79 inPublished:April 1, 1998Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0192880845

ISBN - 13:9780192880840

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Table of Contents

Doctor Faustus and Hell on earth; John Donne: Farewell to Love; The wit and weight of Clarendon George Crabbe's thoughts of confinement; Jane Austen and the business of mothering; Victorian Lives: E. C. Gaskells Charlotte Bronte, Froudes Carlyle, Tennysons Tennyson, George Eliot: She was stillyoung; A note on Hardys A Spellbound Palace; Racines Phedre, Lowells Phaedra; Austins swink; Literature and the matter of fact; Literary principles as against theory; Criticism at the present time: two notes: What is at stake in the battle of the books, William Empson and the loony hunters.

From Our Editors

The successor to Christopher Ricks's The Force of Poetry, this collection of critical essays still attends to poets and poetry: to John Donne's farewells to love, George Crabbe's constraints, Hardy's reading of history, and Robert Lowell as translator of Racine. But other literary worlds are also appreciated in Essays in Appreciation. Drama: Marlowe's Doctor Faustus and the plague. History: the Earl of Clarendon and composition. The novel: Jane Austen and mothering. Victorian lives: E. C. Gaskell's Charlotte Bronte; Froude's Carlyle; Hallam Tennyson's Tennyson; and George Eliot and her age. Philosophy: J. L. Austin and his art of allusion. Finally, critical questions: Literature and the matter of fact, and literary principles as against theory; plus two notes on criticism at the present time, one on talk of the canon, and the other on Empson and political criticism.

Editorial Reviews

`literary criticism of an intellectual zestfulness which makes everyone else in the field look half asleep'The Spectator