Essays On Some Of The Peculiarities Of The Christian Religion

Paperback | January 9, 2012

byRichard Whately

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This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text, images, or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1837. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... (meaning with our notion of their happiness)--this is to me an additional proof of the total and general disbelief prevailing in his age and country. His carelessness of expression (his opinion being such as it clearly was) shows that he never apprehended the slightest danger of any one's supposing him to be speaking of a life after death. None of his readers was likely to suspect him of designing to teach a doctrine so strange and unphilosophical as, in their eyes, this would have appeared. Note (B) page 44. Cicero, in his epistles to his friends, in which, if any where, he may be supposed to speak his real sentiments, frankly avows his utter disbelief in a future state, in one sense of the word, i. e. a future state of distinct personal existence percipient of pleasure or pain: "ut mortem, quam etiam beati contemnere debeamus, propterea quod nullum semum esset habitura," &c. [Epist. to L. Mescinus Fam. Ep. lib. v. ep. 21.] And in an epistle to Toranius [lib. vi. ep. 3.] he says, "nec enim dum ero, angar ulla re, cum omni vacem culpa; et si non ero, semu omnino carebo^ This passage will indeed bear another meaning, viz. that he is speaking, not of life or death on earth, but of the state after death; in which it may be said, he declares his conviction, that if he continues to exist, his innocence will secure him from suffering, and if he has no being at all, he will have no sensation. The former of these would have been indeed a sufficiently bold assumption: while the latter, "that he who does not exist has no perception," is a truism which I think he would hardly have announced with so much solemnity. Be this as it may however, the passage from the other epistle just quoted, in which the very same expression is used, makes it sufficiently clear that h...

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This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text, images, or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1837. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... (meaning with our notion of their happiness)--this is to me an additional proof of the total and general disbelief prevailin...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:78 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.16 inPublished:January 9, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217714528

ISBN - 13:9780217714525

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