Essential Electronic Design Automation (EDA)

Paperback | October 1, 2003

byMark D. Birnbaum

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Preface Purpose of This Book The tremendous increase in the use of tiny electronic devices is common knowledge. We find them everywhere today, in cars, household appliances, telephones, music, and business equipment. The typical car or house uses dozens of them. These devices are called microchips or integrated circuits ICs . Today a single IC can do more than an entire roomful of equipment just a decade ago. Integrated circuits are small enough to hold in your hand, yet contain millions of tiny electronic components. Engineers create detailed design plans to make ICs, similar to an architect's building plans. Architects use computer tools to design a building and predict the structure's response to storms or earthquakes. Similarly, IC designers use computer program tools to design an IC, test its performance, and verify its behavior. We refer to the tools as electronic design automation EDA . An entire industry has evolved to provide these tools to aid the IC designers. This book introduces readers to the EDA industry. It discusses both the technical and business aspects of EDA in clear non-technical language without equations. The text briefly describes the related semiconductor industry issues and evolving chip design problems addressed by the EDA tools. A unique, dialog format presents the technical material in an easy-to-read manner. The book focuses solely on EDA for IC design, intentionally excluding other design automation areas e.g., printed circuit boards and mechanical design . The text gives generic tool descriptions since company and product names change rapidly. Intended Audience The electronic product industry consists of electronic system manufacturers, semiconductor companies, and chip design houses. Semiconductor equipment providers, test equipment manufacturers, and EDA companies are also part of the industry. In most of these firms, over half the employees are non-technical or "semi-technical." These semi-technical people are involved in the EDA or related industries. Experienced employees will have picked up some jargon and knowledge, but both they and most new employees lack an overall introduction to this highly technical field. Sales and marketing, communications, legal, or finance personnel will find the book useful. Others in financial analysis, public relations, or publications firms also need to know about the EDA industry. Some readers will be interested only in the overview, business, or industry sections, while others will focus on particular technical EDA chapters. Along with the semi-technical people, many people with technical backgrounds will find the book very beneficial. The technical backgrounds include computer engineering, programming, electronic testing, mechanical engineering, packaging, or academic fields. These readers may not have EDA backgrounds and so seek a simple introduction to EDA. The book is thus helpful to new employees, both technical and non-technical. Some readers may be familiar with a portion of EDA and want to see "the big picture." Others may focus on technical areas relevant to their own work. Faculty and students in universities, colleges, community colleges, and technical institutes can use the book as an introduction to the IC and EDA industries. The book will fit well in cross-discipline business/engineering courses. Technical students will find the full coverage useful and complementary to an academic course on ICs or EDA. Non-technical readers include: Within the organization: Marketing communications, sales, and marketing personnel Human relations, administrative personnel, and new hires Manufacturing, purchasing, and operations personnel Finance, accounting, and legal personnel Outside the organization: Financial analysts, law firms Public relations, publications, or media representatives Manufacturing representatives, personnel recruiters, or technical writers Technical readers include: Electrical engineers new to EDA Mechanical, packaging, and quality assurance engineers Programmers software engineers Technical marketing and support personnel Academic fields include: Electrical, Mechanical, Systems, and Computer Engineering Physics Computer Science and Programming Business, Marketing, and Management Organization The book's successive chapters build on each other, forming a logical sequence. However, most chapters can be read independently. The book may also serve as a reference source, using the several appendixes. Chapter 1 gives an overview of EDA tools, the people who use them, and the design tasks they support. EDA tools address specific design issues, so one has to understand those problems. Chapter 2 describes the EDA business itself. Chapter 3 provides a user perspective on EDA technical and business issues. Chapter 4 discusses the range of EDA tools and introduces some essential concepts. Chapters 5, 6, and 7 focus on the three major EDA design tool areas: electronic system-level, functional chip-level, and physical. System-level tools help decide what the IC will do and how it will be made. Chip-level tools help design how the IC will operate function . Physical design tools help implement the actual IC physical layout. Chapter 8 discusses EDA industry trends and related IC design issues.Since readers have a wide range of backgrounds, several appendixes fill in the technology basics. Appendixes A, B, and C introduce in simple English elementary electricity, semiconductor manufacture, and computer basics. Many technical EDA and semiconductor terms are confusing. Most terms are metrics--each with different units of measure such as inches, mils, or microns . Some are in English units, some are in metric units, and some are in both, depending on the context. Appendix D describes and compares these metrics.Appendix E has pointers to other EDA reference sources for the reader to explore further. These include organizations, conferences, magazines, the Internet, and universities. Appendix F provides more depth in several areas that affect the EDA business. These include deep submicron issues, intellectual property, and system-on-chip. Every human enterprise such as medicine, law, or academia has its own jargon. EDA is no exception. There is a myriad of strange terms. Many come from the semiconductor world addressed by the EDA tools. In addition, there are all sorts of abbreviations and acronyms. The text defines many terms in context, and Appendix G provides an extensive glossary/acronym list with acronym pronunciation. In summary, readers will be introduced to both the business and technical aspects of the EDA industry. They will learn about EDA tools, the designers who use them, and their design problems. In addition, they will gain insight into the current and future role of EDA in the electronics industries.

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From the Publisher

Preface Purpose of This Book The tremendous increase in the use of tiny electronic devices is common knowledge. We find them everywhere today, in cars, household appliances, telephones, music, and business equipment. The typical car or house uses dozens of them. These devices are called microchips or integrated circuits ICs . Today a s...

From the Jacket

Essential Electronic Design Automation (EDA) A unique, easy-to-understand introduction to the EDA software tools used to design IC microchips Includes all aspects of EDA: business, technical, tool vendor and end user views, IC and EDA industry trends Explains (in simple English) the concepts and terminology of IC design issues ...

MARK D. BIRNBAUM brings unique qualifications to this subject, having worked as an EDA user, manager, developer and tool vendor. Mr. Birnbaum's experience at nine major computer, semiconductor, EDA and research organizations spans the electronics design world from system products to IC chips. He has held senior positions in engineeri...

other books by Mark D. Birnbaum

Format:PaperbackDimensions:256 pages, 9 × 6.9 × 0.8 inPublished:October 1, 2003Publisher:Pearson EducationLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0131828290

ISBN - 13:9780131828292

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From the Author

PrefacePurpose of This BookThe tremendous increase in the use of tiny electronic devices is common knowledge. We find them everywhere today, in cars, household appliances, telephones, music, and business equipment. The typical car or house uses dozens of them. These devices are called microchips or integrated circuits (ICs). Today a single IC can do more than an entire roomful of equipment just a decade ago. Integrated circuits are small enough to hold in your hand, yet contain millions of tiny electronic components. Engineers create detailed design plans to make ICs, similar to an architect’s building plans. Architects use computer tools to design a building and predict the structure’s response to storms or earthquakes. Similarly, IC designers use computer program tools to design an IC, test its performance, and verify its behavior. We refer to the tools as electronic design automation (EDA). An entire industry has evolved to provide these tools to aid the IC designers. This book introduces readers to the EDA industry. It discusses both the technical and business aspects of EDA in clear nontechnical language without equations. The text briefly describes the related semiconductor industry issues and evolving chip design problems addressed by the EDA tools. A unique, dialog format presents the technical material in an easytoread manner. The book focuses solely on EDA for IC design, intentionally excluding other design automation areas (e.g., printed circuit boards and mechanical design). The text gives generic tool descriptions since company and product names change rapidly. Intended AudienceThe electronic product industry consists of electronic system manufacturers, semiconductor companies, and chip design houses. Semiconductor equipment providers, test equipment manufacturers, and EDA companies are also part of the industry. In most of these firms, over half the employees are nontechnical or "semitechnical." These semitechnical people are involved in the EDA or related industries. Experienced employees will have picked up some jargon and knowledge, but both they and most new employees lack an overall introduction to this highly technical field. Sales and marketing, communications, legal, or finance personnel will find the book useful. Others in financial analysis, public relations, or publications firms also need to know about the EDA industry. Some readers will be interested only in the overview, business, or industry sections, while others will focus on particular technical EDA chapters. Along with the semitechnical people, many people with technical backgrounds will find the book very beneficial. The technical backgrounds include computer engineering, programming, electronic testing, mechanical engineering, packaging, or academic fields. These readers may not have EDA backgrounds and so seek a simple introduction to EDA. The book is thus helpful to new employees, both technical and nontechnical. Some readers may be familiar with a portion of EDA and want to see "the big picture." Others may focus on technical areas relevant to their own work. Faculty and students in universities, colleges, community colleges, and technical institutes can use the book as an introduction to the IC and EDA industries. The book will fit well in crossdiscipline business/engineering courses. Technical students will find the full coverage useful and complementary to an academic course on ICs or EDA. Nontechnical readers include:Within the organization: Marketing communications, sales, and marketing personnelHuman relations, administrative personnel, and new hires Manufacturing, purchasing, and operations personnel Finance, accounting, and legal personnelOutside the organization: Financial analysts, law firmsPublic relations, publications, or media representativesManufacturing representatives, personnel recruiters, or technical writers Technical readers include:Electrical engineers new to EDAMechanical, packaging, and quality assurance engineersProgrammers (software engineers) Technical marketing and support personnelAcademic fields include:Electrical, Mechanical, Systems, and Computer Engineering PhysicsComputer Science and ProgrammingBusiness, Marketing, and Management OrganizationThe book’s successive chapters build on each other, forming a logical sequence. However, most chapters can be read independently. The book may also serve as a reference source, using the several appendixes. Chapter 1 gives an overview of EDA tools, the people who use them, and the design tasks they support. (EDA tools address specific design issues, so one has to understand those problems.) Chapter 2 describes the EDA business itself. Chapter 3 provides a user perspective on EDA technical and business issues. Chapter 4 discusses the range of EDA tools and introduces some essential concepts. Chapters 5, 6, and 7 focus on the three major EDA design tool areas: electronic systemlevel, functional chiplevel, and physical. Systemlevel tools help decide what the IC will do and how it will be made. Chiplevel tools help design how the IC will operate (function). Physical design tools help implement the actual IC physical layout. Chapter 8 discusses EDA industry trends and related IC design issues.Since readers have a wide range of backgrounds, several appendixes fill in the technology basics. Appendixes A, B, and C introduce (in simple English) elementary electricity, semiconductor manufacture, and computer basics. Many technical EDA and semiconductor terms are confusing. Most terms are metricseach with different units of measure (such as inches, mils, or microns). Some are in English units, some are in metric units, and some are in both, depending on the context. Appendix D describes and compares these metrics.Appendix E has pointers to other EDA reference sources for the reader to explore further. These include organizations, conferences, magazines, the Internet, and universities.Appendix F provides more depth in several areas that affect the EDA business. These include deep submicron issues, intellectual property, and systemonchip. Every human enterprise (such as medicine, law, or academia) has its own jargon. EDA is no exception. There is a myriad of strange terms. Many come from the semiconductor world addressed by the EDA tools. In addition, there are all sorts of abbreviations and acronyms. The text defines many terms in context, and Appendix G provides an extensive glossary/acronym list with acronym pronunciation.In summary, readers will be introduced to both the business and technical aspects of the EDA industry. They will learn about EDA tools, the designers who use them, and their design problems. In addition, they will gain insight into the current and future role of EDA in the electronics industries.

Read from the Book

Preface Purpose of This Book The tremendous increase in the use of tiny electronic devices is common knowledge. We find them everywhere today, in cars, household appliances, telephones, music, and business equipment. The typical car or house uses dozens of them. These devices are called microchips or integrated circuits (ICs). Today a single IC can do more than an entire roomful of equipment just a decade ago. Integrated circuits are small enough to hold in your hand, yet contain millions of tiny electronic components. Engineers create detailed design plans to make ICs, similar to an architect's building plans. Architects use computer tools to design a building and predict the structure's response to storms or earthquakes. Similarly, IC designers use computer program tools to design an IC, test its performance, and verify its behavior. We refer to the tools as electronic design automation (EDA). An entire industry has evolved to provide these tools to aid the IC designers. This book introduces readers to the EDA industry. It discusses both the technical and business aspects of EDA in clear non-technical language without equations. The text briefly describes the related semiconductor industry issues and evolving chip design problems addressed by the EDA tools. A unique, dialog format presents the technical material in an easy-to-read manner. The book focuses solely on EDA for IC design, intentionally excluding other design automation areas (e.g., printed circuit boards and mechanical design). The text gives generic tool descriptions since company and product names change rapidly. Intended Audience The electronic product industry consists of electronic system manufacturers, semiconductor companies, and chip design houses. Semiconductor equipment providers, test equipment manufacturers, and EDA companies are also part of the industry. In most of these firms, over half the employees are non-technical or "semi-technical." These semi-technical people are involved in the EDA or related industries. Experienced employees will have picked up some jargon and knowledge, but both they and most new employees lack an overall introduction to this highly technical field. Sales and marketing, communications, legal, or finance personnel will find the book useful. Others in financial analysis, public relations, or publications firms also need to know about the EDA industry. Some readers will be interested only in the overview, business, or industry sections, while others will focus on particular technical EDA chapters. Along with the semi-technical people, many people with technical backgrounds will find the book very beneficial. The technical backgrounds include computer engineering, programming, electronic testing, mechanical engineering, packaging, or academic fields. These readers may not have EDA backgrounds and so seek a simple introduction to EDA. The book is thus helpful to new employees, both technical and non-technical. Some readers may be familiar with a portion of EDA and want to see "the big picture." Others may focus on technical areas relevant to their own work. Faculty and students in universities, colleges, community colleges, and technical institutes can use the book as an introduction to the IC and EDA industries. The book will fit well in cross-discipline business/engineering courses. Technical students will find the full coverage useful and complementary to an academic course on ICs or EDA. Non-technical readers include: Within the organization: Marketing communications, sales, and marketing personnel Human relations, administrative personnel, and new hires Manufacturing, purchasing, and operations personnel Finance, accounting, and legal personnel Outside the organization: Financial analysts, law firms Public relations, publications, or media representatives Manufacturing representatives, personnel recruiters, or technical writers Technical readers include: Electrical engineers new to EDA Mechanical, packaging, and quality assurance engineers Programmers (software engineers) Technical marketing and support personnel Academic fields include: Electrical, Mechanical, Systems, and Computer Engineering Physics Computer Science and Programming Business, Marketing, and Management Organization The book's successive chapters build on each other, forming a logical sequence. However, most chapters can be read independently. The book may also serve as a reference source, using the several appendixes. Chapter 1 gives an overview of EDA tools, the people who use them, and the design tasks they support. (EDA tools address specific design issues, so one has to understand those problems.) Chapter 2 describes the EDA business itself. Chapter 3 provides a user perspective on EDA technical and business issues. Chapter 4 discusses the range of EDA tools and introduces some essential concepts. Chapters 5, 6, and 7 focus on the three major EDA design tool areas: electronic system-level, functional chip-level, and physical. System-level tools help decide what the IC will do and how it will be made. Chip-level tools help design how the IC will operate (function). Physical design tools help implement the actual IC physical layout. Chapter 8 discusses EDA industry trends and related IC design issues.Since readers have a wide range of backgrounds, several appendixes fill in the technology basics. Appendixes A, B, and C introduce (in simple English) elementary electricity, semiconductor manufacture, and computer basics. Many technical EDA and semiconductor terms are confusing. Most terms are metrics--each with different units of measure (such as inches, mils, or microns). Some are in English units, some are in metric units, and some are in both, depending on the context. Appendix D describes and compares these metrics.Appendix E has pointers to other EDA reference sources for the reader to explore further. These include organizations, conferences, magazines, the Internet, and universities. Appendix F provides more depth in several areas that affect the EDA business. These include deep submicron issues, intellectual property, and system-on-chip. Every human enterprise (such as medicine, law, or academia) has its own jargon. EDA is no exception. There is a myriad of strange terms. Many come from the semiconductor world addressed by the EDA tools. In addition, there are all sorts of abbreviations and acronyms. The text defines many terms in context, and Appendix G provides an extensive glossary/acronym list with acronym pronunciation. In summary, readers will be introduced to both the business and technical aspects of the EDA industry. They will learn about EDA tools, the designers who use them, and their design problems. In addition, they will gain insight into the current and future role of EDA in the electronics industries.

Table of Contents



Preface.


Purpose of This Book.


Intended Audience.


Organization.


Acknowledgements.


1. Introduction to EDA.

Introduction. Electronic Products. Printed Circuit (PC) Boards. Integrated Circuits. CAD, CAM, CAE, and EDA. Data, Signals, and Input/Output. Electronic Product Development. EDA Party—Users and Tools. System Design. Logic Design. ASIC Design. Physical Layout Design. EDA Benefits. Summary.



2. The Business of EDA.

Introduction. EDA User Return on Investment. EDA Vendor Return On Investment. EDA Tool Development Sources. In-house/Out-source EDA Tool Development. The Time-to-Market Competition. EDA Business Models. New EDA Tools. Licensing Models. Mergers and Acquisitions. Application Service Provider Model. Design Services Business. EDA Industry Growth. Relative Industry Sizes: EDA, IC, Electronics. Relative Risk Factor. EDA People and Conferences. People Opportunities. Key Conferences. Summary. Quick Quiz.



3. The User Perspective.

Introduction. Four Key EDA User Decisions. Organization. Computer Network. Security Requirements. Computer Systems. Engineering / Non-engineering Goals. How to Buy EDA Tools—Five Key Issues. Cost/Performance. Training and Support. Make or Buy. Compatibility. Transition. Standards Efforts—Who, What, and Why. Design Flow Integration. EDA Tool Interface Standards. Frameworks. Design Database Standards. Standards Groups. Personnel—The Key to EDA Support. University Connections. Summary. Quick Quiz.



4. Overview of EDA Tools and Design Concepts.

Introduction. Tool Improvements. Major Classes of EDA Tools. Electronic System-Level Design Tools. Front-end Design Tools. Back-end Design Tools. Essential EDA Concepts. Design Views. Design Data. Design Hierarchy. Design—The Art of Trial and Error. Design Styles. Design Partitioning. Architecture, Methodology, and Design Flow. IC Architectures. Design Methodology and Design Flow. Tool Suites. Summary. Quick Quiz.



5. Electronic System-Level Design Tools.

Introduction. Specification Guidelines. System-Level Design Tools. High-Level Modeling. System-Level Design Languages. Design Space Exploration and Trade-offs. Test Bench Creation. Other System-Level Tools. Hardware/Software Integration. Approaches to Co-Design. Hardware and Software Co-Design. Embedded Systems. Real Time. Reliability. Summary. Quick Quiz.



6. Front-end Design Tools.

Introduction. Design Capture Tools. Hardware Description Languages. Specialized Design Tools. Netlist Output. Design Capture Checking Tools. Verification Tools. Design Verification. Simulation. Simulation Speed. Formal Verification Tools. Device and Circuit Simulators. Timing Analysis Tools. Dynamic Timing Analysis. Static Timing Analysis. Clocks. Signal Timing. Design for Test Tools. Design for Test. Boundary Scan. Built-in Self Test. Power-Related Tools. Power Estimation Tools. Low-Power Design Tools. Synthesis Tools. Summary. Quick Quiz.



7. Back-end Design Tools (Physical Design).

Introduction. Physical Layout Tools. Floorplanning Tools. Placement and Routing Tools. Layout Styles. Power Routing Tools. Design Rule Check Tools. Extraction and Timing Analysis Tools. Signal Integrity Issues. Signal Integrity. Voltage Sensitivity. Noise Margin. Buffers. Switching Noise. Electromagnetic Interference. Metal Migration. Thermal Design Tools. Manufacturing Preparation Steps. Merging Operations. Electrostatic Discharge Protection. Mask-Making Preparations. Diagnostic and Manufacturing Tests. Automatic Test Pattern Generation. Product Engineering Tools. Porting Designs to New Processes. Summary. Quick Quiz.



8. Trends.

EDA Design Environment Trends. Integrated Design Suites. Run-Time Control Tools. Distributed Design. System Design Links to Chip Design. EDA Tool Trends. Design Closure. Formal Verification. Design Repair. Design for Test. Design for Manufacture (DFM) Trends. Design Redundancy. Chip-to-Chip Differences. Mask Enhancements. System-on-chip and IP Trends. Semiconductor Trends. Performance Design Issues. Power and Thermal Design Issues. Physical Design Issues. New Materials and Lithography150 Summary.



Appendix A: Elementary Electricity.

Introduction. Atoms and Electrons. Conductors, Insulators, and Semiconductors. Electrical Attributes. Electrical Current. Electrical Voltage. Resistance. Capacitance. Inductance. Direct and Alternating Current. Other Electrical Effects. Static Electricity. Coupling. Waves. Electrical Components. Semiconductor Devices.



Appendix B: Semiconductor Manufacturing.

Introduction. Manufacturing Process. Masks and Feature Size. Manufacturing Test. Packaging. IC Testing. Process Improvements.



Appendix C: Signals to Software.

Introduction. Transistor Circuits. Analog and Digital. Analog. Digital. Analog and Digital. Memory. Logic. Signal Delay. Computers. Software.



Appendix D: Metrics.

Introduction. Small Numbers. Large Numbers.



Appendix E: References.

Conferences. Organizations. Standards Groups. Publications. EDA Internet Sites. Universities.



Appendix F: ICs, IP, and SoC.

The IC Industry. Product Design. Integrated Circuit Design. Design Handoff. Design Re-use and Intellectual Property. Design Re-use. Intellectual Property. Types of IP Blocks. IP Vendor Business Models. IP Re-use Issues. System-on-Chip. SoC Issues. Platforms. Summary.



Appendix G: Glossary-Terms and Acronyms.


Index.


About the Author.