Essential JavaBeans Fast by John HuntEssential JavaBeans Fast by John Hunt

Essential JavaBeans Fast

byJohn Hunt

Paperback | July 27, 1998

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Essential JavaBeans fast de-mystifies the terminology and gets programmers using the JavaBean components quickly and effectively in their own applications. Programmers can either read the book from start-to-finish (it shouldnt take long) or can dip into it for various aspects of JavaBeans where needed. The book focuses on all the necessary elements for getting started on and using JavaBeans. Many examples are included and readers are encouraged to try them out as they go, to get a real feel for how JavaBeans work.
Title:Essential JavaBeans FastFormat:PaperbackDimensions:174 pagesPublished:July 27, 1998Publisher:Springer-Verlag/Sci-Tech/TradeLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1852330325

ISBN - 13:9781852330323

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Table of Contents

1 Introduction to JavaBeans.- Objectives.- Is this book for you?.- How to use this book.- Why have software components?.- What are JavaBeans?.- JavaBeans and other component models.- The JavaBeans package.- Bean terminology.- Builder tool support.- Building an application.- What you need to use JavaBeans.- How to get the BDK.- What you get in the BDK.- Program conventions.- 2 Using the BeanBox.- Objectives.- Starting the BeanBox.- The BeanBox.- TheBeanBox menus.- Working with Beans.- Connecting Beans together.- Adding Beans to the BeanBox.- Builder tools.- 3 The Delegation Event Model.- Objectives.- Background.- What is an event?.- Delegating responsibility for an event.- Event listeners.- Working with events.- Creating new events.- Defining new listener interfaces.- Multicast and unicast sources.- Events and Beans.- 4 Building Basic Beans.- Objectives.- The JavaBeans architecture.- Creating a bean.- The Beans conventions.- The Beanlnfo object.- The Counter and Alarm beans.- Packaging the beans.- Using the beans.- JavaBeans and you.- 5 Property Data Types.- Objectives.- Simple properties.- Bound properties.- Constrained properties.- Indexed properties.- 6 Reflection and Bean Introspection.- Objectives.- Reflection.- The introspection process.- How it actually works.- Experimenting with introspection.- 7 Beanlnfo Objects.- Objectives.- The jaya.beans package.- Beanlnfo objects.- The Beanlnfo interface.- Classes used with Beanlnfo.- The SimpleBeanlnfo class.- Additionallnfo objects.- The getBeanDescriptor method.- 8 An example BeanInfo Object.- Objectives.- The Clock bean.- The ClockBeanlnfo class.- The geticon ( ) method.- The getPropertyDescriptors ( ) method.- The getMethodDescriptors ( ) method.- Handling bound properties.- The manifest and JAR files.- 9 Bean Serialization.- Objectives.- Serialization in Java.- Serializing a bean.- Defining beans that can be serialized.- 10 Property Editors and Customizers.- Objectives.- Changing property values.- The Property Sheet.- Property Views.- Property Editors.- The PropertyEditor interface.- The PropertyEditorSupport class.- Registering a PropertyEditor.- Customizers.- 11 JavaBeans and ActiveX.- Objectives.- The Component Object Model.- What is ActiveX?.- ActiveX bridge.- Packaging a Bean.- Creating an ActiveX component.- Using the ActiveX component in a container.- Runtime support.- 12 Event Adapters.- Objectives.- Event adapters.- The use of event adapters.- Defining event adapters.- 13 RMI and Beans.- Objectives.- Non-graphical beans.- Remote Method Invocation.- the RMIClientBean.- The Manifest file.- Building the JAR file.- Using the RMI bean.- Appendix A: The Clock Bean.- Appendix B: The Monitor Bean.- Appendix C: The Alarm Bean.- Appendix D: The Multiplexer.- Appendix E: RMI beans.

From Our Editors

Essential JavaBeans fast demystifies the terminology and gets programmers using the JavaBean components quickly and effectively in their own applications. The book focuses on all the necessary elements for getting started with JavaBeans. The topics covered include using the BeanBox, how the Delegation Event Model works, creating a simple Bean, properties supported by JavaBeans, defining a BeanInfo object, and lots more. Many examples are included, and readers are encouraged to try them out as they go.