Excommunicated from the Union: How the Civil War Created a Separate Catholic America by William B. KurtzExcommunicated from the Union: How the Civil War Created a Separate Catholic America by William B. Kurtz

Excommunicated from the Union: How the Civil War Created a Separate Catholic America

byWilliam B. Kurtz

Paperback | December 1, 2015

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Anti-Catholicism has had a long presence in American history. The Civil War in 1861 gave Catholic Americans a chance to prove their patriotism once and for all. Exploring how Catholics sought to use their participation in the war to counteract religious and political nativism in the United States, Excommunicated from the Union reveals that while the war was an alienating experience for many of 200,000 Catholics who served, they still strove to construct a positive memory of their experiences in order to show that their religion was no barrier to their being loyal American citizens.
William Kurtz is an Assistant Editor at Documents Compass, a program of the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities. He has published several articles and a book chapter on Catholics in the Civil War, including "Let Us Hear No More Nativism" (Civil War History, 2014), "William Starke Rosecrans" (U.S. Catholic Historian, 2013), and "This...
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Title:Excommunicated from the Union: How the Civil War Created a Separate Catholic AmericaFormat:PaperbackDimensions:250 pagesPublished:December 1, 2015Publisher:Fordham University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0823268861

ISBN - 13:9780823268863

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Excommunicated from the Union is an outstanding work of Civil War history and recommended for all scholars and students interested in religion in the conflict, the North in the war, and more generally the Irish and German immigrant experience.