Existentially Closed Groups

Hardcover | August 1, 1995

byGraham Higman, Elizabeth Scott

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This book provides an introduction to the theory of existentially closed groups, for both graduate students and established mathematicians. It is presented from a group theoretical, rather than a model theoretical, point of view. The recursive function theory that is needed is included in thetext. Interest in existentially closed groups first developed in the 1950s. This book brings together a large number of results proved since then, as well as introducing new ideas, interpretations and proofs. The authors begin by defining existentially closed groups, and summarizing some of the techniques that are basic to infinite group theory (e.g. the formation of free products with amalgamation and HNN-extensions). From this basis the theory is developed and many of the more recently discoveredresults are proved and discussed. The aim is to assist group theorists to find their way into a corner of their subject which has its own characteristic flavour, but which is recognizably group theory.

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From the Publisher

This book provides an introduction to the theory of existentially closed groups, for both graduate students and established mathematicians. It is presented from a group theoretical, rather than a model theoretical, point of view. The recursive function theory that is needed is included in thetext. Interest in existentially closed gro...

Graham Higman is at University of Oxford. Elizabeth Scott is at The Australian National University, Canberra.
Format:HardcoverDimensions:170 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.63 inPublished:August 1, 1995Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198535430

ISBN - 13:9780198535430

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'Since the book was written, quite different developments have begun, concerning equations i groups... the Higman-Scott book should be a rich source of ideas for the new restricted theory.' London Mathematical Society