Explaining Behavior: Reasons in a World of Causes

Paperback | February 5, 1991

byFred Dretske

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Why do human beings move? In this lucid portrayal of human behavior, Fred Dretske provides an original account of the way reasons function in the causal explanation of behavior. Biological science investigates what makes our bodies move in the way they do. Psychology is interested in why persons -- agents with reasons -- move in the way they do. Dretske attempts to reconcile these different points of view by showing how reasons operate in a world of causes. He reveals in detail how the character of our inner states -- what we believe, desire, and intend -- determines what we do.

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Why do human beings move? In this lucid portrayal of human behavior, Fred Dretske provides an original account of the way reasons function in the causal explanation of behavior. Biological science investigates what makes our bodies move in the way they do. Psychology is interested in why persons -- agents with reasons -- move in the wa...

Fred Dretske is Senior Research Scholar in the Department of Philosophy, Duke University.

other books by Fred Dretske

Knowledge And The Flow Of Information
Knowledge And The Flow Of Information

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:180 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.6 inPublished:February 5, 1991Publisher:The MIT Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0262540614

ISBN - 13:9780262540612

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The problem addressed by Dretske of the relation between national and physical explanations of human action has become one of the principal problems in the philosophy of mind and of psychology, and it will be how the classic mind-body problem is going to be debated in the next decade.