Exploring Laws Empire: The Jurisprudence of Ronald Dworkin

Paperback | May 22, 2008

EditorScott Hershovitz

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Exploring Law's Empire is a collection of essays examining the work of Ronald Dworkin in the philosophy of law and constitutionalism. A group of leading legal theorists develop, defend and critique the major areas of Dworkin's work, including his criticism of legal positivism, his theory oflaw as integrity, and his work on constitutional theory.The volume concludes with a lengthy response to the essays by Dworkin himself, which develops and clarifies many of his positions on the central questions of legal and constitutional theory. The volume represents an ideal companion for students and scholars embarking on a study of Dworkin'swork.

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Exploring Law's Empire is a collection of essays examining the work of Ronald Dworkin in the philosophy of law and constitutionalism. A group of leading legal theorists develop, defend and critique the major areas of Dworkin's work, including his criticism of legal positivism, his theory oflaw as integrity, and his work on constitutio...

Scott Hershovitz is an Assistant Professor of Law at the University of Michigan. He received a D.Phil. in Law from the University of Oxford in 2001, where he studied as a Rhodes Scholar. He has published in the Oxford Journal of Legal Studies and Legal Theory.

other books by Scott Hershovitz

Format:PaperbackDimensions:352 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.79 inPublished:May 22, 2008Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199546142

ISBN - 13:9780199546145

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Table of Contents

Stephen Breyer: Introduction: The International Constitutional Judge1. Christopher L. Eisgruber: Should Constitutional Judges Be Philosophers?2. James E. Fleming: The Place of History and Philosophy in the Moral Reading of the American Constitution3. Rebecca L. Brown: How Constitutional Theory Found its Soul: The Contributions of Ronald Dworkin4. S. L. Hurley: Coherence, Hypothetical Cases, and Precedent5. Scott Hershovitz: Integrity and Stare Decisis6. Dale Smith: The Many Faces of Political Integrity7. Jeremy Waldron: Did Dworkin Ever Answer the Crits?8. Stephen Perry: Associative Obligations and the Obligation to Obey the Law9. John Gardner: Law's Aims in Law's Empire10. Mark Greenberg: How Facts Make Law11. Mark Greenberg: Hartian Positivism and Normative Facts: How Facts Make Law IIRonald Dworkin: Response