Fahrenheit 451: A Novel

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Fahrenheit 451: A Novel

by RAY BRADBURY

Simon & Schuster | January 10, 2012 | Trade Paperback

Fahrenheit 451: A Novel is rated 4.46153846153846 out of 5 by 13.
Ray Bradbury’s internationally acclaimed novel Fahrenheit 451 is a masterwork of twentieth-century literature set in a bleak, dystopian future.

Guy Montag is a fireman. In his world, where television rules and literature is on the brink of extinction, firemen start fires rather than put them out. His job is to destroy the most illegal of commodities, the printed book, along with the houses in which they are hidden.

Montag never questions the destruction and ruin his actions produce, returning each day to his bland life and wife, Mildred, who spends all day with her television “family.” But then he meets an eccentric young neighbor, Clarisse, who introduces him to a past where people didn’t live in fear and to a present where one sees the world through the ideas in books instead of the mindless chatter of television.

When Mildred attempts suicide and Clarisse suddenly disappears, Montag begins to question everything he has ever known. He starts hiding books in his home, and when his pilfering is discovered, the fireman has to run for his life.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 256 pages, 8.44 × 5.5 × 0.9 in

Published: January 10, 2012

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1451673310

ISBN - 13: 9781451673319

Found in: Fiction and Literature

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Hard to get better than this One of my favorites growing up. Read again with the same fascination. A must read for book lovers and dystopia fans
Date published: 2015-09-25
Rated 4 out of 5 by from So Great! I am very late to the game in reading this one. While most people read it in high school, this was not a required reading for me. (I did however become very intimate with The Bell Jar by Slyvia Plath in high school so not too much of a disappointment.) I did enjoy this though I did think it was quite short. I was a bit disappointed with the book, mainly the flow, until I reached the end. It left me wondering "why" a lot. Why is this happening, why can this be happening, etc. because there wasn't much of an explanation. There was only the idea that we were supposed to know that literature was banned because it caused people to debate and be "unhappy". But it was never explained why some people had access to the knowledge, like Beatty the captain of the fire department, while others did not. I mean, I would understand if the government officials had access to it, but why the captain? And if the answer is because after reading, he would be determined to burn all the books, then why not have all the firefighters read? Especially since you could be subjective in what you got people to read. If you only gave them books that were poorly written (and a few come to mind here), they might be tempted to burn them all. The best part to me was the comparison of the phoenix to humanity. The idea that humanity dies in flames only to be reborn from the remaining ashes to repeat their same mistakes is something that is now burned into my brain. (See what I did there) And afterward, I spent a lot of time thinking about how this is true -- and how a lot of dystopian novels look at this aspect now. While this wasn't the best written novel, it was still one that I think people should read and understand. Overall: 4/5 stars. I really enjoyed this one, even though it wasn't my usual dystopian type of novel that I read.
Date published: 2015-08-16
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A Timeless Book on the Importance of Book The tone and message of this novel resonates with me, as I truly appreciate what Bradbury conveys to the readers. The use of language is superb.
Date published: 2015-07-21
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Classic I give this book full marks for a thoroughly enjoyable read. I love passages from the past that could easily be true, in many ways, today.
Date published: 2015-07-20
Rated 4 out of 5 by from GOOD BOOK It was a great book but is definatly a book with 1970's style writing even if its based on a future utopian society. Definatly would reccomed to somene 14+ due to some graphic parts. PARTS OF THE BOOK CAN BE DIFFICULT TO UNDERSTAND BECAUSE THE AUTHOR TENDS TO RAMBLE. I also enjoyed the amounts of metaphores and simbolisim. Chapter layout is weird though. Only 3 capters with page length ranging from 119-190 pages. DEFINATLY WORTH READING
Date published: 2015-07-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing Book At first, when I started the book, it didn't look very interesting. However, as I moved on, it started to get more and more engaging and I could not put it down. I love books that make you think, and this book is absolutely one of those. This book will open your eyes and makes you think about the things that society does to people. Amazing book. Definitely recommended.
Date published: 2015-01-05
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Nor a Witty Title I quite enjoyed this novel and think that it is something that everyone should read at least once. The imagery was beautiful! It was one of my favourite things about this novel, that being said, it can be confusing if the book does not have your 100% attention. It also has a thought-provoking message that can still (unfortunately) be applied to our modern society. PS: Please excuse any spelling errors in my review. I'm typing this on my kobo (which is much harder than one would think)
Date published: 2015-01-03
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Essential reading for everyone This made me want to hug every one of my books to my chest and never let go. Masterfully written and even more relevant in an era of constant connectedness and media (over)load.
Date published: 2014-10-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from One of the Best This is now one of my favourite books of all time, even though the story was written years ago it still feels fresh and touches on some of the biggest dilemmas that still face humanity today.
Date published: 2014-10-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A must read! I enjoyed this book when I read it many many years ago, but reading it again now, as an adult, I got even more out of it. If you have not read this book yet, I highly recommend you do. If you have, it is totally worth reading once again.
Date published: 2014-08-25
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A Must Read! I love this book, despite my initial concerns. I didn't think that I would enjoy it, but I dived right into the story and never regretted doing so. A huge thanks to the Englisth teacher who made this a part of our "assigned reading" and really opened my eyes. A world without books? I think I'd rather die.
Date published: 2014-02-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A must read! "A book is a loaded gun in the house next door... Who knows who might be the target of the well-read man?" Stumbling upon this quote got me to read Fahrenheit 451. Everything in this book spoke to me - I was blown away. It challenged me. It made me think. Originally published in the early 50s, it is amazing that the warning or message is more relevant today that it has ever been. Truly a great book and in my top 5.
Date published: 2014-01-23
Rated 3 out of 5 by from for $11 I expected morr
Date published: 2013-04-08

– More About This Product –

Fahrenheit 451: A Novel

Fahrenheit 451: A Novel

by RAY BRADBURY

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 256 pages, 8.44 × 5.5 × 0.9 in

Published: January 10, 2012

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1451673310

ISBN - 13: 9781451673319

Read from the Book

A New Introduction byRay BradburyMarch 12, 2003What is there new to be said about Fahrenheit 451? I have written three or four introductions in the past thirty years trying to explain where the novel came from and how it finally arrived.The first thing to be said is that I feel very fortunate to have survived long enough to join with people who have been paying attention to the novel in this past year.The novel was a surprise then and is still a surprise to me.I've always written at the top of my lungs and from some secret motives within. I have followed the advice of my good friend Federico Fellini who, when asked about his work, said, "Don't tell me what I'm doing, I don't want to know."The grand thing is to plunge ahead and see what your passion can reveal.During the last fifty years I have written a short 25,000-word early version of the novel titled The Fireman, which appeared in Galaxy Science Fiction magazine, and several years later added another 25,000 words for its publication by Ballantine Books.Occupying a house with a new baby daughter, we had to consider my trying to find somewhere that was a bit quieter to do my work. I had no money at that time to rent an office, but wandering around U.C.L.A. one day I heard typing in the basement of the library and went down to see what was going on. I found that there was a room with twelve typewriters that could be rented for ten cents per half hour. Excited at the prospect, I brought a bag of dimes with me and moved into
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From the Publisher

Ray Bradbury’s internationally acclaimed novel Fahrenheit 451 is a masterwork of twentieth-century literature set in a bleak, dystopian future.

Guy Montag is a fireman. In his world, where television rules and literature is on the brink of extinction, firemen start fires rather than put them out. His job is to destroy the most illegal of commodities, the printed book, along with the houses in which they are hidden.

Montag never questions the destruction and ruin his actions produce, returning each day to his bland life and wife, Mildred, who spends all day with her television “family.” But then he meets an eccentric young neighbor, Clarisse, who introduces him to a past where people didn’t live in fear and to a present where one sees the world through the ideas in books instead of the mindless chatter of television.

When Mildred attempts suicide and Clarisse suddenly disappears, Montag begins to question everything he has ever known. He starts hiding books in his home, and when his pilfering is discovered, the fireman has to run for his life.

About the Author

Ray Bradbury, author of more than 500 stories, poems, essays, plays, films, television plays, radio, music, and comic books, was born on August 22, 1920, in Waukegan, Illinois. Twice during his childhood, Bradbury moved with his family to Arizona, returning to the midwest both times before settling permanently in Los Angeles in 1934. At the age of fifteen, Bradbury began submitting short stories to national magazines, beginning his career as one of the best known science-fiction writers of all time. After his graduation from Los Angeles High School in 1938, Bradbury worked his way up from selling newspapers on street corners and publishing short stories in amateur fan magazines to writing the best-selling classics The Martian Chronicles, published in 1950, and Fahrenheit 451, published in 1953. Bradbury has won numerous awards for his works. His Sun and Shadow won the Benjamin Franklin Award of 1953-54 for Best Story in an American Magazine. In 1954, Fahrenheit 451 won the Commonwealth Club of California Gold Medal and Bradbury received an award from the National Institute of Arts and Letters for contribution to American literature. Switch on the Night earned the Boys Club of America Junior Book Award in 1956. Icarus Montgolfier Wright in 1963 garnered an Academy Award nomination for short film. He was honored in 1977 with a World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement, and in 1977 with the Balrog Award for Best Poet. In addition to his writing achievements, Bradbury was the idea
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Editorial Reviews

“One of this country’s most beloved writers . . . A great storyteller, sometimes even a mythmaker, a true American classic.” —Michael Dirda, The Washington Post