Fair Trial: Rights of the Accused in American History

Paperback | April 30, 1999

byDavid J. Bodenhamer

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The only comprehensive survey of rights of the accused in American history, this new text guides the reader through the development of these rights and their central relationship to liberty, justice, and social order. Integrating legal, social, and political history, Fair Trial focuses on thedefendant's rights in theory and practice and traces developments in local and state courts as well as in the U.S. Supreme Court, recognizing that, throughout history, the expression and protection of rights has most often been a matter of local concern. The second volume in the Bicentennial Essayson the Bill of Rights series, co-sponsored by the Organization of American Historians and Oxford University Press, this is an essential introduction to criminal due process and its importance to American liberty.

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From Our Editors

The only comprehensive survey of rights of the accused in America history, this readable new text guides the student through the development of these rights and their central relationship to liberty, justice, and social order. Integrating legal, social, and political history. Fair Trial focuses on the defendant's rights in theory and p...

From the Publisher

The only comprehensive survey of rights of the accused in American history, this new text guides the reader through the development of these rights and their central relationship to liberty, justice, and social order. Integrating legal, social, and political history, Fair Trial focuses on thedefendant's rights in theory and practice a...

From the Jacket

The only comprehensive survey of rights of the accused in America history, this readable new text guides the student through the development of these rights and their central relationship to liberty, justice, and social order. Integrating legal, social, and political history. Fair Trial focuses on the defendant's rights in theory and p...

David J. Bodenhamer is at Indiana University, Indianapolis.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:192 pages, 7.99 × 5.31 × 0.39 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195055594

ISBN - 13:9780195055597

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Table of Contents

Introduction1. The Colonial Background2. The Revolutionary Legacy3. Due Process in the New Republic4. The Meaning of Due Process, 1865-09305. Fair Trial, Federalism, and Rights of the Accused6. Judicial Liberalism and the Due Process Revolution7. Rights of the Accused in a Conservative AgeNotesSuggestions for Further ReadingIndex

From Our Editors

The only comprehensive survey of rights of the accused in America history, this readable new text guides the student through the development of these rights and their central relationship to liberty, justice, and social order. Integrating legal, social, and political history. Fair Trial focuses on the defendant's rights in theory and practice and traces developments in local and state courts as well as in the United States Supreme Court, recognizing that, throughout history, the expression and protection of rights has most often been a matter of local concern.

Editorial Reviews

"A very fine reader on the history and complexities surrounding the development of the law of fair trial in the United States--A highly readable interpretation."--The Journal of Southern History