Fairy Tales, Sexuality, and Gender in France, 1690-1715: Nostalgic Utopias by Lewis C. SeifertFairy Tales, Sexuality, and Gender in France, 1690-1715: Nostalgic Utopias by Lewis C. Seifert

Fairy Tales, Sexuality, and Gender in France, 1690-1715: Nostalgic Utopias

byLewis C. SeifertEditorMichael Sheringham

Paperback | April 27, 2006

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Between 1690 and 1715, well over one hundred literary fairy tales appeared in France, two-thirds of them written by women. The first part of this book situates the rise of this genre within the literary and historical context of late-seventeenth-century France, and the second part examines the representation of sexuality, masculinity and femininity within selected groups of tales. The book proposes a new model for the application of feminist and gender theory to the literary fairy tale, from whatever national tradition.
Title:Fairy Tales, Sexuality, and Gender in France, 1690-1715: Nostalgic UtopiasFormat:PaperbackDimensions:292 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.67 inPublished:April 27, 2006Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:052102627X

ISBN - 13:9780521026277

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments; Introduction; Part I. Marvelous Storytelling: 1. Marvelous realities: toward an understanding of the merveilleux; 2. Reading (and) the ironies of the marvelous; 3. The marvelous in context: the place of the contes de fées in late seventeenth-century France; Part II. Marvelous Desires: 4. Quests for love: visions of sexuality; 5. (De)mystifications of masculinity: fictios of transcendence; 6. Imagining femininity: binarity and beyond; Afterword; Notes, Selected bibliography; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"Seifert provides us with a solid and learned study of French fairy tale in its beginnings. He has much to tell us, and he shows us that we have much to learn." Modern Philology