Families and Farmhouses in Nineteenth-Century America: Vernacular Design and Social Change by Sally McmurryFamilies and Farmhouses in Nineteenth-Century America: Vernacular Design and Social Change by Sally Mcmurry

Families and Farmhouses in Nineteenth-Century America: Vernacular Design and Social Change

bySally Mcmurry

Hardcover | April 30, 1999

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The antebellum era and the close of the 19th century frame a period of great agricultural expansion. During this time, farmhouse plans designed by rural men and women regularly appeared in the flourishing Northern farm journals. This book analyzes these vital indicators of the work patterns,social interactions, and cultural values of the farm families of the time. Examining several hundred owner-designed plans, McMurry shows the ingenious ways in which "progressive" rural Americans designed farmhouses in keeping with their visions of a dynamic, reformed rural culture. From designsfor efficient work spaces to a concern for self-contained rooms for adolescent children, this fascinating story of the evolution of progressive farmers' homes sheds new light on rural America's efforts to adapt to major changes brought by industrialization, urbanization, the consolidation ofcapitalist agriculture, and the rise of the consumer society.
Sally McMurry is at Pennsylvania State University.
Title:Families and Farmhouses in Nineteenth-Century America: Vernacular Design and Social ChangeFormat:HardcoverDimensions:288 pages, 9.49 × 6.5 × 0.98 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195044754

ISBN - 13:9780195044751

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This study approaches the architecture of the progressive farmer's home as an index of social and cultural history, proceeding from the premise that house forms both influence and reflect the fundamental patterns of culture, including family life, child-rearing practices, and the role of the individual.

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"A highly readable and important book....Well illustrated with floor plans, photographs, and perspective drawings, this is a rich and rewarding book that will be of interest to students in American studies, regional history, and vernacular architecture. Recommended."--Choice