Families And The Gravely Ill: Roles, Rules, And Rights

Hardcover | September 1, 1988

byRichard Sherlock

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"This volume joins other recently published works on the ethical and legal considerations of life-sustaining treatments. Sherlock and Dingus focus on medical decision making involving children and incompetent adults, and the issue of how these decisions should be made. Discussion begins with the various meanings of "family" and the psychosocial issues in family involvement. The authors explore differences in decision making for the incompetent adult and for the child, and consider the pros and cons of family decision making as well as alternative decision making methods. They argue for an ethics committee review of selected difficult cases. The use of relevant cases to depict the legal aspects involved in medical decision making for children and incompetent adults helps clarify the issues involved. . . . A valuable reference for graduate or professional collections." Choice

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From the Publisher

"This volume joins other recently published works on the ethical and legal considerations of life-sustaining treatments. Sherlock and Dingus focus on medical decision making involving children and incompetent adults, and the issue of how these decisions should be made. Discussion begins with the various meanings of "family" and the psy...

Format:HardcoverDimensions:201 pages, 9.41 × 7.24 × 0.98 inPublished:September 1, 1988Publisher:GREENWOOD PRESS INC.

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0313256152

ISBN - 13:9780313256158

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?This volume joins other recently published works on the ethical and legal considerations of life-sustaining treatments. Sherlock and Dingus focus on medical decision making involving children and incompetent adults, and the issue of how these decisions should be made. Discussion begins with the various meanings of "family" and the psychosocial issues in family involvement. The authors explore differences in decision making for the incompetent adult and for the child, and consider the pros and cons of family decision making as well as alternative decision making methods. They argue for an ethics committee review of selected difficult cases. The use of relevant cases to depict the legal aspects involved in medical decision making for children and incompetent adults helps clarify the issues involved. The appendix contains statutory and case law in the 24 states that have some law relevant to family involvement in medical decision making. Includes an extensive bibliography of works dealing with the ethical/legal issues and case law involved in terminal care, life-sustaining measures, and decision making for children and incompetent adults. A valuable reference for graduate or professional collections.?-Choice