Family matters: Designing, analysing and understanding family based studies in life course…

Paperback | April 11, 2009

EditorDeborah A. Lawlor, Gita D. Mishra

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Family-based studies, including intergenerational, sibling, and twin studies, are increasingly being used to explore life course epidemiology. However, there are issues relating to study design and the statistical analysis of family-based studies that are still not well understood, andcomprehending the underlying assumptions of these studies and drawing the inferences from them can be complex. This book provides the knowledge and skills required to design, analyse, and correctly interpret family-based studies. It explains what these studies can tell us about life course epidemiology; provides practical guidance on how to set-up and maintain birth cohorts for completing family-basedstudies in life course epidemiology; describes how to undertake appropriate statistical analyses of family-based studies and correctly interpret results from these analyses; and provides examples that illustrate the ways in which family-based studies can enhance our understanding of life courseepidemiology. In addition, there is discussion of difficulties specific to setting up such studies in low- and middle-income countries, and issues relating to proxy informants, where parents provide information on children and vice versa, or siblings provide information about each other. Examplesof how family-based studies have been used in understanding the life course epidemiology of cardiovascular disease, mental health, and reproductive health illustrate the applicability of the research to these areas, but also more generally to the wider field of life course epidemiology.

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Family-based studies, including intergenerational, sibling, and twin studies, are increasingly being used to explore life course epidemiology. However, there are issues relating to study design and the statistical analysis of family-based studies that are still not well understood, andcomprehending the underlying assumptions of these s...

Professor Deborah A. Lawlor completed medical training (University of Bristol) in 1986. She has an MPH (with distinction) from the University of Leeds, an MSc in Medical Statistics from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and a PhD (MRC Training Fellowship, University of Bristol) in Epidemiology. She is the scientific d...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:328 pages, 9.69 × 6.73 × 0.03 inPublished:April 11, 2009Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199231036

ISBN - 13:9780199231034

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Table of Contents

1. Debbie A. Lawlor and Gita D. Mishra: Why family matters - an introductionSection 1: What can family-based studies tell us about life course epidemiology?2. Debbie A. Lawlor, Sam Leary and George Davey Smith: Theoretical underpinning for the use of intergenerational studies in life course epidemiology3. Kate W. Strully and Gita D. Mishra: Theoretical underpinning for the use of sibling studies in life course epidemiology4. Ruth J. F. Loos, Charlotte L. Ridgway and Ken K. Ong: Theoretical underpinning for the use of twin studies in life course epidemiology5. Hazel M. Inskip: Discussant chapter: summary of the theoretical approaches to family-based studies in life course epidemiologySection 2: The practicalities of undertaking family-based studies6. Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen, Mia Madsen and Debbie A. Lawlor: Theoretical underpinning for the use of intergenerational studies in life birth cohorts: a resource for life course studies7. G. David Batty, Cesar G. Victora and Debbie A. Lawlor: Family-based life course studies in low- and middle-income countries8. Susannah Tomkins: Using available family members as proxies to provide information on other family members who are difficult to reach9. Rebecca Hardy and Diana Kuh: Discussant chapter: the practicalities of undertaking family-based studiesSection 3: How to undertake statistical analyses of family-based studies10. Dorothea Nitsch and Gita D. Mishra: Statistical considerations in intergenerational studies11. Samuli Ripatti: Random effects models for sibling and twin-based studies in life course epidemiology12. Amanda Sacker: Discussant chapter: statistical considerations in family-based life course studiesSection 4: Use of family-based studies in life course epidemiology13. Debbie A. Lawlor and David A. Leon: Family-based studies applied to the influence of early life factors on cardiovascular disease14. Stephani L. Hatch and Gita D. Mishra: How family-based studies have added to the understanding of life course epidemiology of mental health15. Susan M. B. Morton and Janet Rich Edwards: How family-based studies have added to understanding the life course epidemiology of reproductive health16. John Lynch and Seungmi Yang: Discussant chapter: using family-based designs in life course epidemiology17. Gita Mishra and Debbie Lawlor: The future of family-based studies in life course epidemiology: challenges and opportunities