Farming for Fuel: The Political Economy of Energy Sources in the United States

Hardcover | July 1, 1988

byFolke Dovring

not yet rated|write a review
As domestic and worldwide petroleum reserves dwindle, America's energy situation continues to worsen. Farming for Fuel offers a major investigation into producing methanol from biomass to replace reliance on petroleum fuels. Dovring's treatment of the topic is thorough and well-reasoned. He suggests that current problems facing the U.S.--vulnerable oil imports, farm surplus production, soil erosion, and air polution--could be eradicated by methanol production on a large scale. The proposed solution, if adopted, would also bring about profound changes in the national economy, including more decentralized industrial location. Dovring's conclusions are revolutionary, challenging general agreement on methanol use, future energy supplies, and energy policy. His innovative work will supply policy-makers and academics with a unified perspective on energy problems and an up-to-date summary of recent data.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$83.52 online
$94.95 list price (save 12%)
In stock online
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

As domestic and worldwide petroleum reserves dwindle, America's energy situation continues to worsen. Farming for Fuel offers a major investigation into producing methanol from biomass to replace reliance on petroleum fuels. Dovring's treatment of the topic is thorough and well-reasoned. He suggests that current problems facing the U.S...

Format:HardcoverDimensions:158 pages, 9.41 × 7.24 × 0.98 inPublished:July 1, 1988Publisher:Praeger Publishers

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0275930084

ISBN - 13:9780275930080

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of Farming for Fuel: The Political Economy of Energy Sources in the United States

Reviews

Extra Content

Editorial Reviews

?Large-scale production of methanol from biomass could replace petroleum imports, reduce surplus farm production by utilizing large acreages for a valuable crop, thereby reducing farmland erosion by removing erosion-vulnerable land from pasturage; reduce air pollution, since a volume unit of methanol's heat value is half that of gasoline, but its propulsion value is 60 percent; and reduce the greenhouse effect and global warming because methanol adds no atmospheric carbon or waste heat. A directed governmental energy policy, currently almost nonexistent, is urgently needed to guide industry planning.?-Energy Books Quarterly