Fatelessness

Kobo ebook | December 18, 2007

byImre Kertesz, Tim Wilkinson

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At the age of 14 Georg Koves is plucked from his home in a Jewish section of Budapest and without any particular malice, placed on a train to Auschwitz. He does not understand the reason for his fate. He doesn’t particularly think of himself as Jewish. And his fellow prisoners, who decry his lack of Yiddish, keep telling him, “You are no Jew.” In the lowest circle of the Holocaust, Georg remains an outsider.
The genius of Imre Kertesz’s unblinking novel lies in its refusal to mitigate the strangeness of its events, not least of which is Georg’s dogmatic insistence on making sense of what he witnesses–or pretending that what he witnesses makes sense. Haunting, evocative, and all the more horrifying for its rigorous avoidance of sentiment, Fatelessness is a masterpiece in the traditions of Primo Levi, Elie Wiesel, and Tadeusz Borowski.


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At the age of 14 Georg Koves is plucked from his home in a Jewish section of Budapest and without any particular malice, placed on a train to Auschwitz. He does not understand the reason for his fate. He doesn’t particularly think of himself as Jewish. And his fellow prisoners, who decry his lack of Yiddish, keep telling him, “You are ...

Imre Kertesz, 1929 - Imre Kertesz was born in Budapest in 1929. With 7,000 other Hungarian Jews he was deported in 1944, at the age of fifteen, from Budapest to Auschwitz and liberated a year later at Buchenwald. Starting in 1948, he worked in Hungary as a journalist with the daily Világosság. He was dismissed in 1951 and conscripted i...

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Format:Kobo ebookPublished:December 18, 2007Publisher:Knopf Doubleday Publishing GroupLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0307425878

ISBN - 13:9780307425874

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Customer Reviews of Fatelessness

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Rated 4 out of 5 by from Adolescent Descent into Hell Fatelessness is a riveting historially-based "Holocaust" novel. It tells of a teen-age boy's graphic experiences in various concentration camps in Europe. This book is unique in that it is told from a teen-ager's simplistic perspective. Most books of this genre are written from an adult's point-of-view. Georg Koves, a sheltered Hungarian boy, is thrust into the confusion and degradation of the camps. He attempts to find a rationale for the ill-treatment of the inmates. What he does not realize is that there is no logical explanation for this abuse. This search for meaning reminds me of a passage in the book, "Survival in Auschwitz", written by Primo Levi about his horrifying experiences in Auschwitz. Levi recounts that his Nazi guard bluntly responded to his queries with the statement, "there is no "why" in Auschwitz". What is remarkable about this novel are Koves" concluding thoughts about his concentration camp experiences. His thoughts appear to be diametrically-opposed to any published testimonials of Holocaust survivors. Fatelessness is provocative. A definite "must read".
Date published: 2006-07-09
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Adolescent Descent into Hell Fatelessness is a riveting historically-based "Holocaust" novel. It tells of a teen-age boy's graphic experiences in the concentration camps of Europe. This book is unique in that it is told from a teen-ager's perspective. Most books of this genre are written from an adult's point-of-view. Georg Koves, the main character, is thrust into the confusion and degradation of the camps. He attempts to find a rationale for the ill-treatment of the inmates. What he does not realize is that "there is no "why" in Auschwitz".(according to Elie Weisel, writer and Holocaust survivor). What is remarkable about this novel are Koves' final thoughts about his Holocaust experiences. His thoughts appear to be diametrically-opposed to any published testimonials of Holocaust survivors. Fatelessness is provocative. A definite "must read"!
Date published: 2006-07-07