Father And Son: Kingsley Amis, Martin Amis, and the British Novel since 1950 by Gavin Keulks

Father And Son: Kingsley Amis, Martin Amis, and the British Novel since 1950

byGavin Keulks

Paperback | December 27, 2004

not yet rated|write a review

Pricing and Purchase Info

$28.95

Earn 145 plum® points

Ships within 3-5 weeks

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

An innovative study of two of England’s most popular, controversial, and influential writers, Father and Son breaks new ground in examining the relationship between Kingsley Amis and his son, Martin Amis. Through intertextual readings of their essays and novels, Gavin Keulks examines how the Amises’ work negotiated the boundaries of their personal relationship while claiming territory in the literary debate between mimesis and modernist aesthetics. Theirs was a battle over the nature of reality itself, a twentieth-century realism war conducted by loving family members and rival, antithetical writers. Keulks argues that the Amises’ relationship functioned as a source of literary inspiration and that their work illuminates many of the structural and stylistic shifts that have characterized the British novel since 1950.

About The Author

Gavin Keulks is professor of English at Western Oregon University.

Details & Specs

Title:Father And Son: Kingsley Amis, Martin Amis, and the British Novel since 1950Format:PaperbackDimensions:336 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.8 inPublished:December 27, 2004Publisher:University Of Wisconsin PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0299192148

ISBN - 13:9780299192143

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of Father And Son: Kingsley Amis, Martin Amis, and the British Novel since 1950

Reviews

Extra Content

Editorial Reviews

"Keulks’ book is holding and absorbing, filled with excellently shrewd and steady analysis of selected novels, essays and interviews set in the context of the status and future of the realistic novel, the transition from modernism to postmodernism, and the existential condition of post-World War II life."—Dale Salwak, Citrus College