Femininity, Crime and Self-Defence in Victorian Literature and Society: From Dagger-Fans to…

Hardcover | November 27, 2012

byEmelyne Godfrey

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This exploration into the development of women's self-defence from 1850 to 1914 features major writers, including H.G. Wells, Elizabeth Robins and Richard Marsh, and encompasses an unusually wide-ranging number of subjects from hatpin crimes to the development of martial arts for women.

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This exploration into the development of women's self-defence from 1850 to 1914 features major writers, including H.G. Wells, Elizabeth Robins and Richard Marsh, and encompasses an unusually wide-ranging number of subjects from hatpin crimes to the development of martial arts for women.

EMELYNE GODFREY graduated with a Ph.D. in English from Birkbeck College, University of London, UK. A freelance writer and researcher, she writes academic articles, dictionary and encyclopaedia entries and poetry, and gives lectures to societies. She is a regular contributor to History Today and is the Publicity Officer for the H.G. We...

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:208 pages, 10.82 × 5.79 × 0.74 inPublished:November 27, 2012Publisher:Palgrave MacmillanLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230300316

ISBN - 13:9780230300316

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Extra Content

Table of Contents

List of Figures
Acknowledgments
A Note on the Text
Abbreviations
Introduction
PART I: 'A DOOR OPEN, A DOOR SHUT'
On the Street
Danger en Route
Behind Closed Doors: Bogey-Husbands in Disguise: Mona Caird's The Wing of Azrael (1889)
PART II: FIGHTING FOR EMANCIPATION
Elizabeth Robins' The Convert
The Last Heroine Left?
PART III: THE PRE-WAR FEMALE GAZE
'Where Are You Going To, My Pretty Maid?': Elizabeth Robins on White Slavery
Read My Lips
Bibliography
Index