Ferguson: An Essay On The History Of Civil Society by Adam FergusonFerguson: An Essay On The History Of Civil Society by Adam Ferguson

Ferguson: An Essay On The History Of Civil Society

byAdam FergusonEditorFania Oz-Salzberger

Hardcover | February 23, 1996

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Adam Ferguson''s Essay on the History of Civil Society (first published in 1767) is a classic of the Scottish--and European--Enlightenment. Drawing on such diverse sources as classical authors and contemporary travel literature, Ferguson combines a subtle analysis of modern commercial society with a critique of its abandonment of civic and communal virtues. Central themes in Ferguson''s theory of citizenship are conflict, play, political participation and military valor. The Essay is a bold and novel attempt to reclaim the tradition of active citizenship in the modern state.
Title:Ferguson: An Essay On The History Of Civil SocietyFormat:HardcoverDimensions:322 pages, 8.5 X 5.43 X 0.87 inPublished:February 23, 1996Publisher:Cambridge University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:052144215X

ISBN - 13:9780521442152

Appropriate for ages: All ages

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Table of Contents

1. Of the general characteristics of human nature; 2. Of the history of rude nations; 3. Of the history of policy and arts; 4. Of the consequences that result from advancement of civil and commercial arts; 5. Of the decline of nations; 6. Of corruption and political slavery.

From Our Editors

Adam Ferguson (1723-1816) was one of the central figures in the Scottish Enlightenment. His Essay on the History of Civil Society (first published in 1767) is a bold and novel attempt to reclaim the tradition of active citizenship and apply it to the modern state. Drawing on such diverse sources as classical authors and contemporary travel literature, Ferguson offers a complex model of historical advance which challenges both Hume's and Smith's embrace of modernity and the primitivism of Rousseau. Ferguson combines a subtle analysis of the emergence of modern commercial society with a critique of its abandonment of civic and communal virtues. Central to Ferguson's theory of citizenship are the themes of conflict, play, political participation and military valour. His fascination with the theory of unintended consequences as a model of historical causality does not deter him from insisting on the irreplaceable value of individual, public-minded members of political society.