fib Model Code for Concrete Structures 2010 by fib - federation internationale du betonfib Model Code for Concrete Structures 2010 by fib - federation internationale du beton

fib Model Code for Concrete Structures 2010

byfib - federation internationale du beton

Hardcover | December 4, 2013

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The International Federation for Structural Concrete (fib) is a pre-normative organization. 'Pre-normative' implies pioneering work in codification. This work has now been realized with the fib Model Code 2010. The objectives of the fib Model Code 2010 are to serve as a basis for future codes for concrete structures, and present new developments with regard to concrete structures, structural materials and new ideas in order to achieve optimum behaviour.
The fib Model Code 2010 is now the most comprehensive code on concrete structures, including their complete life cycle: conceptual design, dimensioning, construction, conservation and dismantlement. It is expected to become an important document for both national and international code committees, practitioners and researchers.

The fib Model Code 2010 was produced during the last ten years through an exceptional effort by Joost Walraven (Convener; Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands), Agnieszka Bigaj-van Vliet (Technical Secretary; TNO Built Environment and Geosciences, The Netherlands) as well as experts out of 44 countries from five continents.
The fib Model Code 2010 was produced during the last ten years through an exceptional effort by Joost Walraven (Convener; Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands), Agnieszka Bigaj-van Vliet (Technical Secretary; TNO Built Environment and Geosciences, The Netherlands) as well as experts out of 44 countries from five continents.
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Title:fib Model Code for Concrete Structures 2010Format:HardcoverDimensions:434 pages, 11.95 × 8.6 × 1.1 inPublished:December 4, 2013Publisher:WileyLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:3433030618

ISBN - 13:9783433030615

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Table of Contents

Contributors XVII

Notations XXIII

Acronyms XXXI

Preface 1

1 Scope 2

1.1 Aim of the fib Model Code 2010 3

1.2 Format 3

1.3 Levels of approximation 3

1.4 Structure of the fib Model Code 2010 4

2 Terminology 6

2.1 Definitions 7

2.2 References 19

3 Basic principles 20

3.1 General 21

3.1.1 Levels of performance 21

3.1.2 Levels-of-approximation approach 21

3.2 Performance-based design and assessment 23

3.2.1 General approach 23

3.2.2 Basis for verification 23

3.3 Performance requirements for serviceability, structural safety, service life and reliability 25

3.3.1 Performance criteria for serviceability and structural safety 25

3.3.2 Service life 28

3.3.3 Reliability 30

3.4 Performance requirements for sustainability 33

3.4.1 General 33

3.4.2 Performance requirements for environmental impact 34

3.4.3 Performance requirements for impact on society 34

3.5 Life cycle management 35

3.5.1 General 35

3.5.2 Quality management 35

3.5.3 Quality management in design 38

3.5.4 Quality management in construction 45

3.5.5 Quality management in conservation 45

3.5.6 Quality management in dismantlement 46

4 Principles of structural design 48

4.1 Design situations 49

4.2 Design strategies 49

4.3 Design methods 50

4.3.1 Limit state design principles 50

4.3.2 Safety formats 50

4.4 Probabilistic safety format 51

4.4.1 General 51

4.4.2 Basic rules for probabilistic approach 52

4.5 Partial factor format 52

4.5.1 General 52

4.5.2 Basic rules for partial factor approach 60

4.6 Global resistance format 69

4.6.1 General 69

4.6.2 Basic rules for global resistance approach 69

4.7 Deemed-to-satisfy approach 71

4.7.1 General 71

4.7.2 Durability related exposure categories 71

4.8 Design by avoidance 73

5 Materials 74

5.1 Concrete 75

5.1.1 General and range of applicability 75

5.1.2 Classification by strength 75

5.1.3 Classification by density 76

5.1.4 Compressive strength 76

5.1.5 Tensile strength and fracture properties 77

5.1.6 Strength under multiaxial states of stress 79

5.1.7 Modulus of elasticity and Poisson’s ratio 81

5.1.8 Stress–strain relations for short term loading 82

5.1.9 Time effects 86

5.1.10 Temperature effects 94

5.1.11 Properties related to non-static loading 98

5.1.12 Transport of liquids and gases in hardened concrete 101

5.1.13 Properties related to durability 106

5.2 Reinforcing steel 110

5.2.1 General 110

5.2.2 Quality control 110

5.2.3 Designation 110

5.2.4 Geometrical properties 111

5.2.5 Mechanical properties 111

5.2.6 Technological properties 114

5.2.7 Special types of steels 115

5.2.8 Assumptions used for design 115

5.3 Prestressing steel 117

5.3.1 General 117

5.3.2 Quality control 117

5.3.3 Designation 117

5.3.4 Geometrical properties 118

5.3.5 Mechanical properties 118

5.3.6 Technological properties 121

5.3.7 Special types of prestressing steel 122

5.3.8 Assumptions used for design 123

5.4 Prestressing systems 125

5.4.1 General 125

5.4.2 Post-tensioning system components and materials 125

5.4.3 Protection of tendons 128

5.4.4 Stresses at tensioning, time of tensioning 129

5.4.5 Initial prestress 130

5.4.6 Value of prestressing force during design life (time t > 0) 133

5.4.7 Design values of forces in prestressing 137

5.4.8 Design values of tendon elongations 137

5.4.9 Detailing rules for prestressing tendons 138

5.5 Non-metallic reinforcement 139

5.5.1 General 139

5.5.2 Quality control 139

5.5.3 Designation 139

5.5.4 Geometrical properties 140

5.5.5 Mechanical properties 140

5.5.6 Technological properties 142

5.5.7 Assumptions used for design 143

5.6 Fibres/fibre reinforced concrete 144

5.6.1 Introduction 144

5.6.2 Material properties 144

5.6.3 Classification 146

5.6.4 Constitutive laws 146

5.6.5 Stress–strain relationship 148

5.6.6 Partial safety factors 150

5.6.7 Orientation factor 150

6 Interface characteristics 152

6.1 Bond of embedded steel reinforcement 153

6.1.1 Local bond–slip relationship 153

6.1.2 Influence on serviceability 159

6.1.3 Anchorage and lapped joints of reinforcement 159

6.1.4 Anchorage and lapped joints of welded fabric 165

6.1.5 Special circumstances 166

6.1.6 Conditions of service 167

6.1.7 Degradation 167

6.1.8 Anchorage of pretensioned prestressing tendons 169

6.2 Bond of non-metallic reinforcement 171

6.2.1 Local bond stress–slip model 171

6.2.2 Bond and anchorage of internal FRP reinforcement 172

6.2.3 Bond and anchorage of externally bonded FRP reinforcement 172

6.2.4 Mechanical anchorages for externally bonded FRP reinforcement 175

6.3 Concrete to concrete 176

6.3.1 Definitions and scope 176

6.3.2 Interface roughness characteristics 176

6.3.3 Mechanisms of shear transfer 177

6.3.4 Modelling and design 179

6.3.5 Detailing 181

6.4 Concrete to steel 183

6.4.1 Classification of interaction mechanisms 183

6.4.2 Bond of metal sheeting and profiles 183

6.4.3 Mechanical interlock 185

7 Design 190

7.1 Conceptual design 191

7.1.1 General 191

7.1.2 Methodology 191

7.1.3 Structural concept and basis for design 193

7.2 Structural analysis and dimensioning 194

7.2.1 General 194

7.2.2 Structural modelling 194

7.2.3 Dimensioning values 199

7.2.4 Analysis of structural effects of time-dependent behaviour of concrete 205

7.3 Verification of structural safety (ULS) for predominantly static loading 215

7.3.1 General 215

7.3.2 Bending with and without axial force 215

7.3.3 Shear 217

7.3.4 Torsion 226

7.3.5 Punching 227

7.3.6 Design with stress fields and strut-and-tie models 234

7.3.7 Compression members 236

7.3.8 Lateral instability of beams 239

7.3.9 3D solids 240

7.4 Verification of structural safety (ULS) for non-static loading 242

7.4.1 Fatigue design 242

7.4.2 Impact and explosion 246

7.4.3 Seismic design 251

7.5 Verification of structural safety (ULS) for extreme thermal conditions 264

7.5.1 Fire design 264

7.5.2 Cryogenic design 276

7.6 Verification of serviceability (SLS) of RC and PC structures 279

7.6.1 Requirements 279

7.6.2 Design criteria 279

7.6.3 Stress limitation 279

7.6.4 Limit state of cracking 281

7.6.5 Limit states of deformation 288

7.6.6 Vibrations 293

7.6.7 Verification of serviceability limit state by numerical simulation 294

7.7 Verification of safety and serviceability of FRC structures 296

7.7.1 Classification 296

7.7.2 Design principles 296

7.7.3 Verification of safety (ULS) 298

7.7.4 Verification of serviceability (SLS) 302

7.8 Verification of limit states associated with durability 304

7.8.1 General 304

7.8.2 Carbonation induced corrosion – uncracked concrete 305

7.8.3 Chloride induced corrosion – uncracked concrete 308

7.8.4 Influence of cracks upon reinforcement corrosion 310

7.8.5 Risk of depassivation with respect to prestressed  steel 310

7.8.6 Freeze-thaw attack 311

7.8.7 Chemical attack 312

7.8.8 Alkali–aggregate reactions 314

7.8.9 Delayed ettringite formation 314

7.9 Verification of robustness 316

7.9.1 General 316

7.9.2 Specific methods to improve robustness by structural measures 317

7.10 Verification of sustainability 318

7.10.1 Impact on environment 318

7.10.2 Impact on society 320

7.11 Verifications assisted by numerical simulations 322

7.11.1 Purpose 322

7.11.2 Methods of numerical simulation 322

7.11.3 Safety formats for non-linear analysis 324

7.11.4 Resistance parameter identification 327

7.12 Verification assisted by testing 328

7.12.1 Scope 328

7.12.2 Definition 328

7.12.3 Aims of verification assisted by testing 329

7.12.4 Requirements 329

7.12.5 Planning 329

7.12.6 Testing conditions and measurements 331

7.12.7 Laboratory report 331

7.12.8 Statistical analysis of test results 332

7.12.9 Verification procedure 332

7.13 Detailing 334

7.13.1 Basic principles 334

7.13.2 Positioning of reinforcement 334

7.13.3 Prestressed structures 340

7.13.4 Bearings and joints 340

7.13.5 Structural members 341

7.13.6 Special aspects of precast concrete elements and composite structural members 345

7.14 Verification of anchorages in concrete 350

8 Construction 352

8.1 General 353

8.2 Execution management 353

8.2.1 Assumptions 353

8.2.2 Documentation 353

8.2.3 Quality management 353

8.3 Reinforcing steel works 354

8.3.1 Transportation and storage 354

8.3.2 Identification 354

8.3.3 Cutting and bending 355

8.3.4 Welding 356

8.3.5 Joints 357

8.3.6 Assembly and placing of the reinforcement 357

8.3.7 Construction documents – reinforcement 357

8.4 Prestressing works 357

8.4.1 General 357

8.4.2 Packaging, transportation, storage and handling of materials and components 358

8.4.3 Prestressing works for post-tensioning tendons 358

8.4.4 Prestressing works for pretensioning tendons 361

8.4.5 Replacement of tendons 362

8.4.6 Construction documents – prestressing 363

8.5 Falsework and formwork 363

8.6 Concreting 363

8.6.1 Specification of concrete 363

8.6.2 Placing and compaction 364

8.6.3 Curing 364

8.6.4 Execution with precast concrete elements 364

8.6.5 Geometrical tolerances 364

9 Conservation 366

9.1 General 367

9.2 Conservation strategies and tactics 367

9.2.1 General 367

9.2.2 Strategy using proactive conservation measures 368

9.2.3 Strategy using reactive conservation measures 369

9.2.4 Situations where conservation measures are not feasible 369

9.3 Conservation management 370

9.3.1 Through-life conservation process 370

9.3.2 Conservation plan 373

9.4 Condition survey 373

9.4.1 Condition survey and monitoring activities 373

9.4.3 Tools and techniques for surveys and monitoring 374

9.4.4 Gathering data for condition control purposes 375

9.4.5 General flow of condition survey process 377

9.5 Condition assessment 378

9.5.1 Identification of deterioration mechanisms and prediction of damage 378

9.5.2 Identification of deterioration mechanism 378

9.5.3 Factors influencing deterioration 379

9.5.4 Determination of deterioration level and rate 379

9.6 Condition evaluation and decision-making 379

9.6.1 General 379

9.6.2 Threshold levels for deterioration of material and/or structural performance 380

9.6.3 Judgement criteria 380

9.6.4 Selection of interventions 380

9.7 Interventions 381

9.7.1 Maintenance interventions 382

9.7.2 Preventative interventions 382

9.7.3 Remedial interventions 382

9.7.4 Rebuild, reconstruction and replacement 382

9.7.5 Strengthening or upgrading interventions 383

9.7.6 Other activities and measures 383

9.7.7 Execution of interventions 384

9.8 Recording 385

10 Dismantlement 386

10.1 General 387

10.2 Preparing dismantlement 388

10.2.1 General 388

10.2.2 Consequence class of the structure 388

10.2.3 Structural analysis for dismantlement 388

10.2.4 Investigation of potential contamination 388

10.2.5 Waste disposal concept 388

10.2.6 Preparation report 389

10.3 Health and safety provisions 389

Index 390