Fiction and History in England, 1066-1200 by Laura AsheFiction and History in England, 1066-1200 by Laura Ashe

Fiction and History in England, 1066-1200

byLaura Ashe

Paperback | March 3, 2011

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The century and a half following the Norman Conquest of 1066 saw an explosion in the writing of Latin and vernacular history in England, while the creation of the romance genre reinvented the fictional narrative. Where critics have seen these developments as part of a cross-Channel phenomenon, Laura Ashe argues that a genuinely distinctive character can be found in the writings of England during the period. Drawing on a wide range of historical, legal and cultural contexts, she discusses how writers addressed the Conquest and rebuilt their sense of identity as a new, united 'English' people, with their own national literature and culture, in a manner which was to influence all subsequent medieval English literature. This study opens up new ways of reading post-Conquest texts in relation to developments in political and legal history, and in terms of their place in the English Middle Ages as a whole.
Title:Fiction and History in England, 1066-1200Format:PaperbackDimensions:260 pages, 9.02 × 5.98 × 0.59 inPublished:March 3, 2011Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521174368

ISBN - 13:9780521174367

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Table of Contents

Introduction; 1. The Normans in England: a question of place; 2. 'Nos Engleis': war, chronicle, and the new English; 3. Historical romance: a genre in the making; 4. The English in Ireland: ideologies of race; Epilogue; Bibliography.

Editorial Reviews

"...sophisticated and ambitious...Her intricate study provides a timeline that can be productively rethreaded as a knot at stake in provincializing England then and now." --Journal of English and Germanic Philology