Fiction And The Philosophy Of Happiness: Ethical Inquiries In The Age Of Enlightenment by Brian Michael NortonFiction And The Philosophy Of Happiness: Ethical Inquiries In The Age Of Enlightenment by Brian Michael Norton

Fiction And The Philosophy Of Happiness: Ethical Inquiries In The Age Of Enlightenment

byBrian Michael Norton

Paperback | June 10, 2014

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Fiction and the Philosophy of Happiness reads the eighteenth-century novel in the context of emerging theories of happiness in early modern and Enlightenment Europe. This important and richly interdisciplinary book offers both a new understanding of the cultural work the eighteenth-century novel performed as well as an original interpretation of the Enlightenment's ethical legacy.
Brian Michael Norton is assistant professor of English and comparative literature at California State University, Fullerton.
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Title:Fiction And The Philosophy Of Happiness: Ethical Inquiries In The Age Of EnlightenmentFormat:PaperbackDimensions:168 pages, 8.96 × 6.05 × 0.52 inPublished:June 10, 2014Publisher:Bucknell University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1611485894

ISBN - 13:9781611485899

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Table of Contents

ContentsIntroduction: After the Summum Bonum: Eighteenth-CenturyEnquiries after Happiness 1. The Moral in Phutatorius's Breeches: Stoicism, Subjectivism and the Possibilities of Happiness in Tristram Shandy 2. "Vous croyez que le même bonheur est fait pour tous": Ethics and Singularity in Le Neveu de Rameau 3. Tragic Eudaimonism: Social Contradictions and the Problem of Happiness in Rousseau's Julie 4. The Politics of Happiness: Caleb Williams, Political Justice and the Nature of Human Goods 5. Rethinking Autonomy: Emma Courtney, Feminist Ethics and the Question of Independence Conclusion: The Art of Life in the Age of Enlightenment Bibliography Index About the Author

Editorial Reviews

Fiction and the Philosophy of Happiness is an excellent comparatist study of changing ideas of happiness in both philosophy and the novel, as sure-footed with the French as with the English texts it examines. Norton reveals a productive tension in the eighteenth century between happiness understood as the categorical "good life"-the virtuous life that is right for all rational agents-and happiness conceived as "being pleased with one's life" in subjective and infinitely various ways. Impeccably researched and crisply written, this book will be of enduring importance.