Fictions of Labor: William Faulkner and the Souths Long Revolution by Richard GoddenFictions of Labor: William Faulkner and the Souths Long Revolution by Richard Godden

Fictions of Labor: William Faulkner and the Souths Long Revolution

byRichard Godden

Paperback | October 15, 2007

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Fictions of Labor considers William Faulkner's representation of the structural paradoxes of labour dependency in the Southern economy from the antebellum period through to the New Deal. This book seeks to link stylistic aspects of Faulkner's writing to a generative social trauma which constitutes its formal core. That trauma, Godden argues, is a labour trauma, centred on the debilitating discovery by the Southern owning class of its own production by those it subordinates. Using close textual analysis and careful historical contextualization, Richard Godden produces a persuasive account of the ways in which Faulkner's work rests on deeply submerged anxieties about the legacy of violently coercive labour relations in the American South.

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Title:Fictions of Labor: William Faulkner and the Souths Long RevolutionFormat:PaperbackDimensions:308 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.71 inPublished:October 15, 2007Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521044278

ISBN - 13:9780521044271

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements; Introduction; 1. Quentin Compson: Tyrrhenian vase or crucible of race?; 2. Absalom, Absalom! Haiti and labor history: reading unreadable revolutions; 3. Absalom, Absalom! and Rosa Coldfield: or, 'What is in the Dark House?'; 4. The persistence of Thomas Sutpen: Absalom, Absalom!, time, and labor discipline; 5. Forget Jerusalem, go to Hollywood - 'To Die. Yes. To Die?' (A coda to Absalom, Absalom!); Afterword; Notes; Bibliography of works cited; Index.