Fifty Years Of Segregation: Black Higher Education In Kentucky, 1904-1954 by John A. HardinFifty Years Of Segregation: Black Higher Education In Kentucky, 1904-1954 by John A. Hardin

Fifty Years Of Segregation: Black Higher Education In Kentucky, 1904-1954

byJohn A. Hardin

Paperback | September 1, 1997

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Kentucky was the last state in the South to introduce the practice of racially segregated schools. Yet, it was one of the first to break down racial barriers in higher education. What happened in the intervening live decades, during which the Commonwealth seemingly followed the typical southern patterns of separation?

After the passage of the infamous Day Law in 1904, which forced segregation of the state's public and private schools, black educators accepted the belief of the state's white leaders that vocational education best served the needs of African Americans. In the late 1920s there began a shift toward liberal arts curricula, along with efforts to upgrade faculty credentials in black colleges, though black faculty were not allowed to attend in-state graduate and professional schools. The 1940s and early 1950s saw important challenges to the Day Law -- most notably, Lyman Johnson's suit for admission to the University of Kentucky's doctoral program in history -- and attacks on salary and funding discrimination based on race.

Fifty Years of Segregation places Kentucky's experience within the context of regional and national struggles against segregated higher education. This well-written, carefully researched study of a crucial half-century in Kentucky's history will appeal to anyone with an interest in the Commonwealth.

Title:Fifty Years Of Segregation: Black Higher Education In Kentucky, 1904-1954Format:PaperbackDimensions:192 pages, 8.76 × 5.78 × 0.8 inPublished:September 1, 1997Publisher:University Press of Kentucky

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0813120241

ISBN - 13:9780813120249

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Kentucky was the last state in the South to introduce the practice of racially segregated schools. Yet, it was one of the first to break down racial barriers in higher education. What happened in the intervening live decades, during which the Commonwealth seemingly followed the typical southern patterns of separation?After the passage of the infamous Day Law in 1904, which forced segregation of the state's public and private schools, black educators accepted the belief of the state's white leaders that vocational education best served the needs of African Americans. In the late 1920s there began a shift toward liberal arts curricula, along with efforts to upgrade faculty credentials in black colleges, though black faculty were not allowed to attend in-state graduate and professional schools. The 1940s and early 1950s saw important challenges to the Day Law -- most notably, Lyman Johnson's suit for admission to the University of Kentucky's doctoral program in history -- and attacks on salary and funding discrimination based on race.Fifty Years of Segregation