Finance and Fictionality in the Early Eighteenth Century: Accounting for Defoe by Sandra ShermanFinance and Fictionality in the Early Eighteenth Century: Accounting for Defoe by Sandra Sherman

Finance and Fictionality in the Early Eighteenth Century: Accounting for Defoe

bySandra Sherman

Paperback | October 20, 2005

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In the early eighteenth century, the increasing dependence of society on financial credit provoked widespread anxiety. Texts of credit stock--certificates, IOUs, bills of exchange--were denominated as potential "fictions," while the potential fictionality of other texts was measured in terms of the "credit" they deserved. Sandra Sherman argues that the work of Daniel Defoe, which straddles both finance and literature, epitomizes the market's capacity to unsettle discourse, and to blur the distinctions between finance and fiction.
Title:Finance and Fictionality in the Early Eighteenth Century: Accounting for DefoeFormat:PaperbackDimensions:236 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.55 inPublished:October 20, 2005Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521021421

ISBN - 13:9780521021425

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Table of Contents

Introduction; 1. Credit and its discontents: the credit-fiction homology; 2. Defoe and fictionality; 3. Credit and honesty in The Compleat English Tradesman; 4. Fictions of stability; 5. Lady Credit's reprise: Roxana.

Editorial Reviews

"Sherman presents a rich reading of a central problem for those who would confront Defoe's fictional and quasi-fictional work..." 1650-1850