Finnegans Wake by James JoyceFinnegans Wake by James Joyce

Finnegans Wake

byJames Joyce

Paperback | July 9, 2012

Pricing and Purchase Info

$20.88 online 
$23.95 list price save 12%
Earn 104 plum® points

Prices and offers may vary in store

Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

'And low, stole o'er the stillness the heartbeats of sleep'In Chapelizod, a suburb of Dublin, an innkeeper and his family are sleeping. Around them and their dreams there swirls a vortex of world history, of ambition and failure, desire and transgression, pride and shame, rivalry and conflict, gossip and mystery. This is a book that reinvents the novel andplays fantastic games with the language to tell the story of one man's fall and resurrection; in the intimate drama of Humphrey Chimpden Earwicker and his wife Anna Livia, the character of Ireland itself takes form. Joyce called time and the river and the mountains the real heroes of his book, andits organic structure and extraordinary musicality embody his vision. It is both an outrageous epic and a wildly inventive comedy that rewards its readers with never-ending layers of meaning.In the introduction to this newly set edition, which faithfully maintains the original page layout, Finn Fordham guides the reader through the novel's complexity, and suggests a range of ways into the book.
Robbert-Jan Henkes and Eric Bindervoet are writers, translators, and artists based in Amsterdam. They translated Finnegans Wake into Dutch in 2002 in a bilingual edition, and it is their English setting that provides the text of this edition. Their translations of King Lear and Ulysses will appear in 2012. Finn Fordham is the author of...
Loading
Title:Finnegans WakeFormat:PaperbackDimensions:720 pages, 7.72 × 5.08 × 0 inPublished:July 9, 2012Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199695156

ISBN - 13:9780199695157

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Must Read!! If you're curious about this book, head to the nearest library to see if they have a copy. Sample the text, see if it's something bizarre enough for you. If you've enjoyed, Portrait of an Artist as a Young Man, then braved Ulysses & enjoyed the experience, go for this one. If you hated Ulysses after re-reading it, give FW a pass. If you loved Ulysses on the 2nd reading, jump into FW. Dive in like braving an ocean depths without requiring a lifeboat or even an understanding. FW is an experience in non-understanding & a reminder of being illiterate. There's more than enough puzzles & multi-lingual puns to keep the sharpest reader intrigued for a lifetime. Forego 100% of outside help, this book is best read with your own mind's interpretations. It's a boat ride to simply enjoy the scenery of, no reason to study the rudder or operation manuals that are abundant.
Date published: 2018-08-22
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Finnegans Wake by James Joyce Looks daunting, unintelligible and incomprehensible at first. However, read it aloud and with open mind and the meaning might come down on you. I said "might" because no matter how much thinking I put on some of the paragraphs or lines, some meanings seemed so obscure and I had no choice but to let them stay that way.Still I found this book amazing. It is one of its kind. What amazed me really was its play of words. Unmatched. Never seen before. Close to it so far is Anthony Burgess's Clockwork but it seems like kindergarten level to Joyce's masteral degree. Joyce used what they call as "portmanteau" or the fusing together of two or more words in the same or different languages. Thus "kissmiss" is both the festive season and something that might happen during it, with a suggestion of fatefulness; the Holy Father becomes a "hoary frother"; and an old photo is a "fadograph." Reading this book requires Job's patience but in the end, it is rewarding for the fact that this is another testimony to James Joyce's brilliance as a writer. Finnegans Wake is the playful luminous moon to Ulysses' serious bright sun. One complement the other like flaunting to the world that James Joyce could be funny after writing the very profound retelling of Homer's classic epic poem, Odyssey.
Date published: 2018-06-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ??? I tired but didn't finish - 5 stars for writing the craziest book ever imagined
Date published: 2018-05-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ??? I tired but didn't finish - 5 stars for writing the craziest book ever imagined
Date published: 2018-05-18
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Finnegans Wake by James Joyce Looks daunting, unintelligible and incomprehensible at first. However, read it aloud and with open mind and the meaning might come down on you. I said "might" because no matter how much thinking I put on some of the paragraphs or lines, some meanings seemed so obscure and I had no choice but to let them stay that way.Still I found this book amazing. It is one of its kind. What amazed me really was its play of words. Unmatched. Never seen before. Close to it so far is Anthony Burgess's Clockwork but it seems like kindergarten level to Joyce's masteral degree. Joyce used what they call as "portmanteau" or the fusing together of two or more words in the same or different languages. Thus "kissmiss" is both the festive season and something that might happen during it, with a suggestion of fatefulness; the Holy Father becomes a "hoary frother"; and an old photo is a "fadograph." Reading this book requires Job's patience but in the end, it is rewarding for the fact that this is another testimony to James Joyce's brilliance as a writer. Finnegans Wake is the playful luminous moon to Ulysses' serious bright sun. One complement the other like flaunting to the world that James Joyce could be funny after writing the very profound retelling of Homer's classic epic poem, Odyssey.
Date published: 2018-04-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ???? five stars or one - it's all the same - most difficult novel ever written
Date published: 2018-02-18
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Tough Nothing but respect for Joyce, but this is unreadable.
Date published: 2017-06-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Too Much I only read about a 100 pages on this attempt of the FW, but I'll try it again. Its either a 1 star or five star book, depending on your tastes; five for me.
Date published: 2016-11-23
Rated 1 out of 5 by from I Wouldn't Bother... FINNEGANS WAKE by James Joyce My Thoughts: I knew going into this book that it is said to be one of the most difficult (English language) books to read. I wouldn't call it difficult, just more...exhausting. I find it hard to enjoy a book that has so little structure and clear plot to it. When I did finally grab onto some clear(ish) plot and understand what the heck was going on something would change and I'd be back to where I started wondering what was going on. Each scene like this never lasted long, almost as if someone was changing the channel of your television every 30 seconds and you could never get a grasp on any of it. Kind of annoying, right? (I did find Book III clearly had the least jumping around, in my opinion, for whatever reason.) I didn't hate reading FINNEGANS WAKE, but I will admit it was a chore, no pleasure reading here. (It's #77 on the list, so I was not going to quit!) One thing I will give Joyce is that I love the "circle plot" in books - FINNEGANS WAKE opens in the middle of a sentence, and ends the middle of that same sentence; I loved that. I also enjoyed some choice quotes from the book, although the majority of the language was a drag to muddle through (some call it genius, but I call it "itwood havebeanbetter without the wordchoiceand writingstilebeeing socrazy"). I found myself reading sentences over and over again to make sure I had cut up the words correctly, and that was a pain and a major barrier for enjoying anything good I could have picked out from this book. If you are not required to read this book for any reason, then I would pass on it, unless you'd like to read something that you are sure your friends probably haven't, or you are a hotshot literature wizard that wants to try to "understand" FINNEGANS WAKE. For average readers who love a great (clearly understandable) story, like myself, there are many other classics that are very enjoyable, and I suggest grabbing one of those instead. Favorite Quotes: "Sweet bad luck on the waves washed to our island." (Page 46) "When I'm dreaming back like that I begins to see we're only all telescopes." (Page 295) "Leave the letter that never begins to go find the latter that ever comes to end, written in smoke and blurred by mist and signed of solitude, sealed at night." (Page 337) Overall Opinion: D (Sorry, Mr. Joyce!) http://kaylasbookcase.blogspot.com/
Date published: 2010-09-01