Fire on the Rim: A Firefighters Season at the Grand Canyon

Paperback | September 1, 1995

byStephen J. Pyne

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In this lively account of one [fire] season, Pyne introduces us to the tightly knit world of a fire crew, to the complex geography of the North Rim, to the technique and changing philosophy of fire management.

- Publishers Weekly

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In this lively account of one [fire] season, Pyne introduces us to the tightly knit world of a fire crew, to the complex geography of the North Rim, to the technique and changing philosophy of fire management. - Publishers Weekly

Stephen J. Pyne is a professor at Arizona State University. The author of ten acclaimed books on environmental history, he won the 1995 "Los Angeles Times'" Robert Kirsch Award for his career contribution to arts & letters. He lives in Glendale, Arizona.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:336 pages, 9.21 × 6.15 × 0.8 inPublished:September 1, 1995Publisher:University of Washington Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0295974834

ISBN - 13:9780295974835

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"Forest fires are both the subject and the main characters in this mesmerizing account by a MacArthur Prize-winning professor who spent 15 summers as a 'Longshot' firefighter. The result is a heady combination of poetic prose, analytic language (trees are 'large fuels'), and ecological polemic directed at the bureaucratic infighting that afflicts the two great administrators of the nation's wilderness-the Park Service and the National Forest Service. . . . This rewarding book should add a 'large fuel' of its own to the debate over our endangered wilderness. - Kirkus