First Confession by Montserrat FontesFirst Confession by Montserrat Fontes

First Confession

byMontserrat Fontes

Paperback | May 5, 1992

Pricing and Purchase Info

$15.29 online 
$16.99 list price save 10%
Earn 76 plum® points

Prices and offers may vary in store

HURRY, ONLY 4 LEFT!
Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

Two spoiled children, the willful Andrea and her cousin Victor, take up spying and stealing when they discover where the town hooker hides her money. Their theft tragically unleashes a series of events, among them murder and suicide.
Montserrat Fontes is a novelist and screenwriter. She currently lives in the Greater Los Angeles area.
Loading
Title:First ConfessionFormat:PaperbackDimensions:320 pages, 8.25 × 5.25 × 0.6 inPublished:May 5, 1992Publisher:WW Norton

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0393308472

ISBN - 13:9780393308471

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

From Our Editors

Mexican-American writer Fontes tells a startling tale of the clashes between men and women, rich and poor, Mexican and American in this dark story of life just south of the Texas border. Two spoiled children, the willful Andrea and her cousin Victor, take up spying and stealing when they discover where the town hooker hides her money. Their theft tragically unleashes a series of events, among them murder and suicide.

Editorial Reviews

Calvocoressi resists the limitations of language—especially where gender is concerned—to more fully capture the experience of a self “unlimited in its possibilities.” The setting of her third collection is woodsy, nocturnal, and by turns sinister and merciful; where “it did get dark” enough to see the stars “but how bright it was.” A range of characters compose a makeshift cast—or family—fluid enough to include a hermit, a cowboy, and a dowager. These poems balance wildness and control in a fearless treatment of eros, identity, trauma, and all that resists easy categorization. The voice encompasses the colloquial as well as the high lyrical: “Oak leaves so full of late summer// sun even I thought, Obscene, and stood stunned/ for a moment.” When particular forms aren’t up to the task of rendering something with tender and unflinching attentiveness, Calvocoressi reaches outside of poetry altogether: “Oh. It. Was. Beautiful. No metaphor will do.” — Philadelphia InquirerIn this follow-up to Apocalyptic Swing, a finalist for the Los Angeles Time Book Award, queer lesbian poet Calvocoressi uses the Dal Segno, a musical symbol directing the player to return to an earlier spot in the score, as a pronoun embodying “a confluence of genders” when referencing the Bandleader. There’s a sense that the speaker wants to return to an earlier time, too, a throwback feel to the pastoral scenes she sets and a need to shuck convention. The speaker and the Bandleader meet in a series of poems strung throughout this thought-provoking collection, and the use of the Dal Segno immediately strips away expectation, making the focus on the acts of looking and touching rather than body parts interacting conventionally.   — San Francisco ChronicleA splendid tour de force. I picked the book up and could not put it down. . . . She renders the border-life in all its stark and realistic darkness. . . . The children, Andrea and Victor, are alive and full of light, carrying in their hearts a bit of each of us. — Jimmy Santiago Boca