Five Miles Away, A World Apart: One City, Two Schools, and the Story of Educational Opportunity in…

Paperback | October 15, 2011

byJames E. Ryan

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How is it that, half a century after Brown v. Board of Education, educational opportunities remain so unequal for black and white students, not to mention poor and wealthy ones? In his important new book, Five Miles Away, A World Apart, James E. Ryan answers this question by tracing the fortunes of two schools in Richmond, Virginia - one in the city and the other in the suburbs. Ryan shows how court rulings in the 1970s, limiting the scope of desegregation, laid thegroundwork for the sharp disparities between urban and suburban public schools that persist to this day. The Supreme Court, in accord with the wishes of the Nixon administration, allowed the suburbs to lock nonresidents out of their school systems. City schools, whose student bodies were becomingincreasingly poor and black, simply received more funding, a measure that has proven largely ineffective, while the independence (and superiority) of suburban schools remained sacrosanct. Weaving together court opinions, social science research, and compelling interviews with students, teachers, and principals, Ryan explains why all the major education reforms since the 1970s - including school finance litigation, school choice, and the No Child Left Behind Act - have failed tobridge the gap between urban and suburban schools and have unintentionally entrenched segregation by race and class. As long as that segregation continues, Ryan forcefully argues, so too will educational inequality. Ryan closes by suggesting innovative ways to promote school integration, which wouldtake advantage of unprecedented demographic shifts and an embrace of diversity among young adults. Exhaustively researched and elegantly written by one of the nation's leading education law scholars, Five Miles Away, A World Apart ties together, like no other book, a half-century's worth of education law and politics into a coherent, if disturbing, whole. It will be of interest to anyone who hasever wondered why our schools are so unequal and whether there is anything to be done about it.

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How is it that, half a century after Brown v. Board of Education, educational opportunities remain so unequal for black and white students, not to mention poor and wealthy ones? In his important new book, Five Miles Away, A World Apart, James E. Ryan answers this question by tracing the fortunes of two schools in Richmond, Virginia - o...

James E. Ryan is William L. Matheson and Robert M. Morgenthau Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Virginia School of Law. He is a former clerk to Chief Justice William Rehnquist.

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The Standard Arithmetic: For Schools of All Grades and for Business Purposes, Volume 2
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Hardcover|May 24 2016

$34.46 online$36.95list price(save 6%)
see all books by James E. Ryan
Format:PaperbackDimensions:400 pages, 6.1 × 9.09 × 1.1 inPublished:October 15, 2011Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:019983685X

ISBN - 13:9780199836857

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Table of Contents

Introduction Freeman and Tee-JayPart One: Past: School Desegregations and Middle America1. Buying Time2. Don't Cross That LinePart Two: Present: Save the Cities, Spare the Suburbs3. Desegregating Dollars4. Like a Russian Novel: School Finance Litigation in State Courts5. Limited Choices6. The Impact of Choice and the Role of Courts7. Lowering the Bar: The Standards and Testing MovementPart Three: Future: Demography Is Opportunity8. In Search of Ties That BindEpilogue: Freeman and Tee-Jay Revisited