Food in Medieval England: Diet and Nutrition

Paperback | July 15, 2009

byC. M. Woolgar, D. Serjeantson, T. Waldron

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Food and diet are central to understanding daily life in the middle ages. In the last two decades, the potential for the study of diet in medieval England has changed markedly: historians have addressed sources in new ways; material from a wide range of sites has been processed byzooarchaeologists and archaeobotanists; and scientific techniques, newly applied to the medieval period, are opening up possibilities for understanding the cumulative effects of diet on the skeleton. In a multi-disciplinary approach to the subject, this volume, written by leading experts indifferent fields, unites analysis of the historical, archaeological, and scientific record to provide an up-to-date synthesis. The volume covers the whole of the middle ages from the early Saxon period up to c .1540, and while the focus is on England wider European developments are not ignored.The first aim of the book is to establish how much more is now known about patterns of diet, nutrition, and the use of food in display and social competition; its second is to promote interchange between the methodological approaches of historians and archaeologists. The text brings together muchoriginal research, marrying historical and archaeological approaches with analysis from a range of archaeological disciplines, including archaeobotany, archaeozoology, osteoarchaeology, and isotopic studies.

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Food and diet are central to understanding daily life in the middle ages. In the last two decades, the potential for the study of diet in medieval England has changed markedly: historians have addressed sources in new ways; material from a wide range of sites has been processed byzooarchaeologists and archaeobotanists; and scientific t...

C. M. Woolgar is a Reader and Head of Special Collections at the University of Southampton Library. D. Serjeantson is a Research Fellow in the Department of Archaeology at the University of Southampton. T. Waldron is a Consultant Physician at St. Mary's Hospital in London and Honorary Professor at the Institute of Archaeology at Unive...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:368 pagesPublished:July 15, 2009Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199563357

ISBN - 13:9780199563357

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Table of Contents

1. C. M. Woolgar, D. Serjeantson, T. Waldron: IntroductionPart I: Survey of Foodstuffs2. D. J. Stone: The Consumption of Field Crops in Medieval England3. C. C. Dyer: Gardens and Garden Produce in Later Medieval England4. L. Moffett: The Archaeology of Medieval Plant Foods5. N. J. Sykes: From Cu and Sceap to Beffe and Motton: The Management, Distribution, and Consumption of Cattle and Sheep, AD 410-15506. U. Albarella: Pig Husbandry and Pork Consumption in Medieval England7. C. M. Woolgar: Meat and Dairy Products in Late Medieval England8. D. Serjeantson and C. M. Woolgar: Fish Consumption in Medieval England9. D. Serjeantson: Birds: Food and a Mark of Status10. D. J. Stone: The Consumption and Supply of Birds in Late Medieval England11. N. J. Sykes: The Impact of the Normans on Hunting Practices in England12. J. Birrell: Procuring, Preparing, and Serving Venison in Late Medieval EnglandPart II: Studies in Diet and Nutrition13. C. M. Woolgar: Group Diets in Late Medieval England14. C. C. Dyer: Seasonal Patterns in Food Consumption in the Later Middle Ages15. B. F. Harvey: Monastic Pittances in the Middle Ages16. G. Muldner and M. P. Richards: Diet in Medieval England: The Evidence from Stable Isotopes17. P. R. Schofield: Diet and Medieval Demography18. T. Waldron: Nutrition and the Skeleton19. C. M. Woolgar, D. Serjeantson, T. Waldron: ConclusionBibliographyIndex

Editorial Reviews

''a valuable addition to Oxford University Press's impressive Medieval History and Archaeology series" --(Mark Page, English Historical Review)