For the Common Good?: American Civic Life and the Golden Age of Fraternity

Paperback | March 24, 2004

byJason Kaufman

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The Golden Age of Fraternity was a unique time in American history. Joining clubs, fraternities, militias, and mutual benefit societies between the Civil and First World Wars was so prevalent that many contemporaries see it as a model for a revitalization of American civil society today.Relying on extensive analysis of city directories, club histories, and membership lists, For the Common Good? aims to dispel many of the myths about the curative powers of clubbing while bringing to light the hidden lessons therein.

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The Golden Age of Fraternity was a unique time in American history. Joining clubs, fraternities, militias, and mutual benefit societies between the Civil and First World Wars was so prevalent that many contemporaries see it as a model for a revitalization of American civil society today.Relying on extensive analysis of city directories...

Jason Kaufman is at Harvard University.

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Hardcover|Feb 16 2009

$87.44 online$89.95list price
Format:PaperbackDimensions:304 pages, 6.1 × 9.21 × 0.59 inPublished:March 24, 2004Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195148584

ISBN - 13:9780195148589

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"...a man on a mission. Dissenting from Alexis de Tocqueville and Robert Putnam, [Kaufman] examines the dark side of American voluntary associations...Kaufman carefully chronicles the development of a wide array of associations, including volunteer fire companies, business associations,shooting clubs, and, most especially, fraternal societies...He raises many challenging questions that other scholars have failed to ask. A copy of For the Common Good? should be on the shelf of any specialist in the history of American voluntary associations."--EH.NET