Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock

Paperback | July 1, 2014

byMatthew Quick

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In addition to the P-38, there are four gifts, one for each of my friends. I want to say good-bye to them properly. I want to give them each something to remember me by. To let them know I really cared about them and I'm sorry I couldn't be more than I was--that I couldn't stick around--and that what's going to happen today isn't their fault.
Today is Leonard Peacock's birthday. It is also the day he will kill his former best friend, and then himself, with his grandfather's P-38 pistol. Maybe one day he'll believe that being different is okay, important even. But not today.

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In addition to the P-38, there are four gifts, one for each of my friends. I want to say good-bye to them properly. I want to give them each something to remember me by. To let them know I really cared about them and I'm sorry I couldn't be more than I was--that I couldn't stick around--and that what's going to happen today isn't their...

Matthew Quick (aka Q) is the author ofThe Silver Linings Playbook(Sarah Crichton Books / Farrar, Straus & Giroux) and three young adult novels,Sorta Like a Rock Star,Boy21, andForgive Me, Leonard Peacock(Little, Brown & Co.). His work has received many honors--including a PEN/Hemingway Award Honorable Mention--been translated into many...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:304 pages, 8.25 × 5.5 × 1 inPublished:July 1, 2014Publisher:Little, Brown Books for Young ReadersLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:031622135X

ISBN - 13:9780316221351


Rated 4 out of 5 by from powerful - read with your teen This book made me mad, it made me cry, it made me want to hug my children and their friends. This book made me want to say thank-you to those who see beyond the surface to the real person underneath. Leonard is done, he wants the pain to end, he doesn't want to be here any more. The emotional abuse he has suffered doesn't show on the outside, but he is hurting all the same. This book looks at the damage we inflict on each other. From bullies at school, to parents who are oblivious to the needs of their children. Just because there aren't any cuts nor blood, it doesn't mean that there isn't hurt and Leonard is definitely hurting. Forgive me, Leonard Peacock puts the reader inside the head of a boy who is depressed and doesn't know how to cope any longer. Everything that he did came across as so very real. The bargaining with himself, doing things he thought would punish his mother, saying anything just to get by for another day, another hour, another minute. The desperation, the cries for help were all there, would anyone notice. At the same time, he puts up a solid front of being okay, of not showing weakness. The book also looks at the support network for our children. Kids can reach out to parents, teachers, neighbours, even strangers on the street is they see the slightest glimmer of hope. From the opening paragraphs I was hooked. I didn't want to put it down. I listened to the audio book as read by Noah Galvin. unabridged - 6 hours 19 minutes. It was an excellent choice as there were many times when the tears were flowing and I wouldn't have been able to continue as I couldn't wipe them away fast enough. Forgive me, Leonard Peacock is a strong story and should be widely read in a group setting. Parents reading it with their teens need to be open to discussing the situation and educating their family about depression and how to get help. In Canada, call the Kids Help Line toll free at 1-800-668-6868
Date published: 2016-05-06
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Very powerful How can I describe this book? It gave me the feels, all the emotions, all the desperation that our main character Leonard goes through. This book ripped me apart, picked up the pieces and scattered it back together again to make me whole. This isn't a happy book, at depressing and can be downright truthful. There were just so many points and feelings that I agreed with that I just couldn't stop quoting from the book. Leonard is extremely eloquent and his thoughts are purely simple and not condescending. (This is why I hated Fault in Our Stars..HATED the characters so much.) Not Leonard though. He was broken. So completely broken and Matthew Quick puts you in his mindset and never lets go. I read this in two sittings..I plopped myself on that couch and didn't stop until I finished. Such strong characters and the way he develops them are brilliant. Even the secondary characters that play a part in Leonard's overall story add so much depth. The story lines all converge into one ending and I thought it was done pretty well even though I thought it to be weak. The only thing that really bugged me were the amount of footnotes which could be distracting and tediously long. And even though I rarely read realistic fiction, this one goes straight to the top. I did have some issues which is why it's not a perfect 5/5. There was also so much conversation and inner dialogue about death, and religion and how people thought about people who have faith. That really spoke out to me. I really wonder if this is how people believe. That if you don't tell others about Jesus, it makes you a terrible person. That not telling others about Jesus will send you to hell? Does that mean people will force religion down everyone's throats because they only want to save themselves? Getting off topic here, but it's great that this book made me think about these things right? A book about suicide and depression, all written in a beautiful and moving way, I highly recommend this to anyone who is looking for a heavy read. Matthew Quick has made me a fan and I can't wait to read all his other books, particularly his adult books. One of the best contemporary books I've ever read in a LONG TIME.
Date published: 2015-01-14
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A nice book Good book, it makes you open your eyes, and has a very cute ending (my opinion) overall a nice book, about a boy going through depression.
Date published: 2014-07-13
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Love and Tears I loved this book. Despite the sadness, Leonard Peacock is a character that makes you want to keep reading, despite his constant reminder that he will kill his former best friend today, and then proceed to shoot himself. The narration is great and personal and you simply sympathize with Leonard. So many terrible things happen to him, and it breaks your heart to read about Leonard's past. At the same time, this novel quite powerful. It reminded me a LOT of Jay Asher's Thirteen Reasons Why. I'd definitely recommend this book if you are a fan of Asher's novel on teen suicide. I really can't think of any reason why I didn't like it! Nothing average or bad sticks in my mind!
Date published: 2014-01-18
Rated 4 out of 5 by from As good as Silver Linings Playbook This is going to be a hard review to write, so I just want to preface it by saying this: Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock is a fantastic novel. You should read it. Immediately. There. Now that way if I get rambly or emotional I’ve got my central point across. Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock is the story of one, lonely, suicidal boy. This year on his birthday he decides that he’s had enough. He’s going to take his own life. He packs his back pack for the last day of school, bringing only some goodbye gifts for “friends” and a gun. The gun, however, isn’t just for Leonard. It’s also what he will use to shoot is former best friend in the face. Now despite the fact that Leonard Peacock is about to shoot another teenager in the face, as you follow him on his last day, saying goodbye to the people who matter most to him, you realize just how lonely he is and your heart goes out to him. His mom is never around, he doesn’t have any close friends, except for an old man who lives next door. Every day is a struggle for him. And when you find out why is former best friend is “former” it’s like being punched in the gut. Matthew Quick has written a very raw, roller coaster ride of a novel and this story is one that will stick with you. So be prepared! My favourite two things about the novel were the footnotes and the letters from the future. Though there is some humour throughout the novel, I think the best bits are in the footnotes. It is there we really get a sense of Leonard’s quirky personality. And I think it’s there that we really get to know him. Same goes with the letters from the future. They give us a peek into the deeper parts of Leonard. Not just what’s going on with him right now, but his hopes and dreams as well. I was a little confused by them at first, but once I realized what they were they moved me to tears. I need to take a minute and talk about Herr Silverman before I end this review. In my mind he is a hero. He is the kind of teacher that I wish every aspiring teacher would use as a role model. He respects the kids he teaches, he challenges them and above all he cares about what’s going on in their lives. I know being a teacher isn’t easy. I know many have a ton of students and very little extra time. But that interest/care is so important. Herr Silverman goes above and beyond his official responsibilities and made a difference in someone’s life. He is an amazing man, and even though they’re not real, I’m glad Leonard Peacock has him around. Recommendation: Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock is a must read novel. In fact all of Matthew Quick’s novels are must read novels. They’re emotional, they’re poignant and you’ll carry the stories with you (figuratively) where ever you go.
Date published: 2013-09-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The First Contemp to Wow Me. I can see many people will enjoy Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock and I admit, it definitely has a lot going for it. It's a modern story, highlighting two issues that have manage to persist through time. I will only mention one of the issues here, because I want other readers to find out about the other one as they read through the story. If you have read the description on the back of the book, you can probably guessed the issue Leonard Peacock is facing - bullying. He's been bullied to a point that committing a murder-suicide appears to be the best option. Now, I didn't give this book 5-stars because I thought it was a sad story and it moved me. Sometimes, I feel like sad books get automatic good ratings purely because they made the readers cry. Those 5-stars got there because the story was painfully realistic - no matter how much you want to deny it and live in your happy little bubble, this book brings you back down to Earth. And that hurts. Reality sucks but Matthew Quick was able to put to words feelings most of us can't express. And you better believe that deserves 5-stars. So maybe some of you might think the plot is too cookie-cutter, because if you had previously read any bullying story, it probably went down the same way Leonard's story did. But that doesn't make it any less enjoyable. Although his story may sound Plain-Jane, his character wasn't. I was able to feel Leonard's frustrations, confusion and hopelessness. The stylistic choices, like the footnotes and indents, solidified Leonard's character. His brain worked at such a fast pace that it often went on tangents (footnotes) and as a reader reading the book, it added to the chaotic feeling. At points, Leonard's internal struggles packed such a punch that I felt I needed to put down this book and reflect on what I had just read. (This explains why it took me nine days to read a 288 page book, and I'm not trying to come up with an excuse for my reading speed. Or maybe I am.) That's when you know you've got a powerful book in your hands. Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock is my very first Matthew Quick book, and it definitely won't be my last. P.S.: Everyone deserves their own Herr Silverman in life.
Date published: 2013-08-23

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Editorial Reviews

"Leonard's life teeters dangerously between moments of pain and beauty. A fast read, because I needed to keep reading. I will not forget Leonard Peacock. I love this book."

-Jay Asher, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Thirteen Reasons Why and The Future of Us