Foucault/Derrida Fifty Years Later: The Futures of Genealogy, Deconstruction, and Politics

Paperback | November 8, 2016

EditorOlivia Custer, Penelope Deutscher, Samir Haddad

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Early in their careers, Michel Foucault and Jacques Derrida argued over madness, reason, and history in an exchange that profoundly influenced continental philosophy and critical theory. In this collection, Amy Allen, Geoffrey Bennington, Lynne Huffer, Colin Koopman, Pierre Macherey, Michael Naas, and Judith Revel, among others, trace this exchange in debates over the possibilities of genealogy and deconstruction, immanent and transcendent approaches to philosophy, and the practical and theoretical role of the archive.

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Early in their careers, Michel Foucault and Jacques Derrida argued over madness, reason, and history in an exchange that profoundly influenced continental philosophy and critical theory. In this collection, Amy Allen, Geoffrey Bennington, Lynne Huffer, Colin Koopman, Pierre Macherey, Michael Naas, and Judith Revel, among others, trace...

Olivia Custer is a Paris-based scholar and the author of L'Exemple de Kant (2012).Penelope Deutscher is professor of philosophy at Northwestern University.Samir Haddad is associate professor of philosophy at Fordham University.

other books by Olivia Custer

Format:PaperbackDimensions:264 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.68 inPublished:November 8, 2016Publisher:Columbia University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0231171951

ISBN - 13:9780231171953

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Table of Contents

AcknowledgmentsAbbreviationsIntroduction, by Olivia Custer, Penelope Deutscher, and Samir HaddadPart I: Openings1. The Foucault-Derrida Debate on the Argument Concerning Madness and Dreams, by Pierre Macherey2. Looking Back at History of Madness, by Lynne Huffer3. Violence and Hyperbole: From "Cogito and the History of Madness" to The Death Penalty, by Michael NaasPart II: Surviving the Philosophical Problem: History Crosses Transcendental Analysis4. Must Philosophy Be Obligatory? History Versus Metaphysics in Foucault and Derrida, by Colin Koopman5. "The Common Root of Meaning and Nonmeaning": Derrida, Foucault, and the Transformation of the Transcendental Question, by Thomas Khurana6. Philosophies of Immanence and Transcendence: Reading History of Madness with Derrida and Habermas, by Amy AllenPart III: After-Effects7. Foucault, Derrida: The Effects of Critique, by Judith Revel8. A Petty Pedagogy? Teaching Philosophy in Derrida's "Cogito and the History of Madness", by Samir HaddadPart IV: Life, Death, Power: New Death Penalties9. Power and the "Drive for Mastery": Derrida's Freud and the Debate with Foucault, by Robert Trumbull10. "This Death Which Is Not One": Reproductive Biopolitics and the Woman as Exception in The Death Penalty, Volume 1, by Penelope DeutscherPart V: Foucault's and Derrida's Last Seminars11. From Reprisal to Reprise, by Olivia Custer12. The Truth About Parrhesia: Philosophy, Rhetoric, and Politics in Late Foucault, by Geoffrey BenningtonList of ContributorsIndex

Editorial Reviews

This excellent volume makes evident why the Foucault-Derrida debate continues to matter. The problem at the heart of it might ostensibly seem minor - the correct interpretation of a paragraph in Descartes's Meditations. In truth, the stakes could hardly be higher: the status of reason and critique, and ultimately, the future of philosophy itself.