France And England In North America; The Old Régime In Canada Volume 4

Paperback | July 8, 2012

byFrancis Parkman

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1892 edition. Excerpt: ...tlid not entirely cease, was there not a corresponding increase in the population of the colony? Why, more than half a century after the king took Canada in charge, did the census show a total of less than twenty-five thousand souls? The reasons will appear hereafter. It is a peculiarity of Canadian immigration, at this its most flourishing epoch, that it was mainly an immigration of single men and single women. The cases in which entire families came over were comparatively few.1 The new settler was found by the king; sent over by the king; and supplied by the king with a wife, a farm, and sometimes with a house. Well did Louis XIV. earn the title of Father of New France. But the royal zeal was spasmodic. The king was diverted to other cares, and soon after the outbreak of the Dutch war in 1672 the regular despatch of emigrants to Canada wellnigh ceased; though the practice of disbanding soldiers in the colony, giving them lands, and turning them into settlers, was continued in some degree, even to the last. 1 The principal emigration of families seems to have been in 1669 when, at the urgency of Talon, then in France, a considerable numbet were sent out. In the earlier period the emigration of families was, relatively, much greater. Thus, in 1634, the physician Giffard brought over seven to people his seigniory of Beauport. Before 1663, when the king took the colony in hand, the emigrants were for the most part apprenticed laborers. The zeal with which the king entered into the work of stocking his colony is shown by numberless passages in his letters, and those of his minister. " The end and the rule of all your conduct," says Colbert to the intendant Bouteroue, " should be the increase of the colony; and on this point you should never be...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1892 edition. Excerpt: ...tlid not entirely cease, was there not a corresponding increase in the population of the colony? Why, more than half a ...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:116 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.24 inPublished:July 8, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217215777

ISBN - 13:9780217215770

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