From a High Place: A Life of Arshile Gorky by Matthew SpenderFrom a High Place: A Life of Arshile Gorky by Matthew Spender

From a High Place: A Life of Arshile Gorky

byMatthew Spender

Paperback | March 23, 2001

Pricing and Purchase Info

$49.54

Earn 248 plum® points

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

An immigrant from a small Armenian village in eastern Turkey, Arshile Gorky (c. 1900-1948) made his way to the U.S. to become a painter in 1920. Having grown up haunted by memories of his alternately idyllic and terrifying childhood—his family fled the Turks' genocide of Armenians in 1915—he changed his name and created a new identity for himself in America. As an artist, Gorky bridged the generation of the surrealists and that of the abstract expressionists and was a very influential figure among the latter. His work was an inspiration to Willem de Kooning and Mark Rothko, among others. Matthew Spender illuminates this world as he tells the story of Gorky's life and career.
Matthew Spender is a writer and sculptor. He married the eldest daughter of Arshile Gorky in 1968. His previous book, Within Tuscany, is a memoir about the Sienese countryside where they live.
A House in St John's Wood: In Search of My Parents
A House in St John's Wood: In Search of My Parents

by Matthew Spender

$29.99

Available for download

Not available in stores

Title:From a High Place: A Life of Arshile GorkyFormat:PaperbackDimensions:440 pages, 9 × 6 × 1.13 inPublished:March 23, 2001Publisher:University of California PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0520225481

ISBN - 13:9780520225480

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of From a High Place: A Life of Arshile Gorky

Reviews

Editorial Reviews

"Only in America could an Armenian refugee who never set foot in France become the last great exponent of School of Paris painting and the first great exemplar of the postwar New York School of modernism. So this is an American story, and a classic immigrant's story, too -- one of dislocation and self-discovery, of the tension between inbred and acquired identities -- played out not in tenements or on Main Street but in the lofts and salons of the art world."--Robert Storr, "Washington Post Book World