From Christ To Confucius: German Missionaries, Chinese Christians, And The Globalization Of…

Hardcover | November 22, 2016

byAlbert Monshan Wu

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In this accessibly written and empirically based study, Albert Wu documents how German missionaries—chastened by their failure to convert Chinese people to Christianity—reconsidered their attitudes toward Chinese culture and Confucianism. In time, their increased openness catalyzed a revolution in thinking among European Christians about the nature of Christianity itself. At a moment when Europe’s Christian population is falling behind those of South America and Africa, Wu’s provocative analysis sheds light on the roots of Christianity’s global shift.

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In this accessibly written and empirically based study, Albert Wu documents how German missionaries—chastened by their failure to convert Chinese people to Christianity—reconsidered their attitudes toward Chinese culture and Confucianism. In time, their increased openness catalyzed a revolution in thinking among European Christians abo...

Albert Monshan Wu is assistant professor of history at the American University of Paris. He writes regularly for the Los Angeles Review of Books and Commonweal. He lives in Paris, France.
Format:HardcoverDimensions:352 pages, 9.25 × 6.13 × 0.98 inPublished:November 22, 2016Publisher:Yale University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0300217072

ISBN - 13:9780300217070

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From Christ to Confucius offers an intriguing and revisionist account of German Christian missionary activity in China. Breaking out of the conventional debate about cultural imperialism, Albert Wu presents a sophisticated study of the ambiguities and the counter-intuitive effects of the German missionary presence in China.”— Sebastian Conrad, author of What is Global History?