From Goods to a Good Life: Intellectual Property and Global Justice

Hardcover | June 26, 2012

byMadhavi Sunder

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Most scholarship on intellectual property considers this law from the standpoint of law and economics. Under this conventional wisdom, intellectual property is simply a tool for promoting innovative products, from iPods to R2D2. In this highly original book Madhavi Sunder calls for a richer understanding of intellectual property law’s effects on social and cultural life. Intellectual property does more than incentivize the production of more goods. This law fundamentally affects the ability of citizens to live a good life. Intellectual property law governs the abilities of human beings to make and share culture, and to profit from this enterprise in a global Knowledge economy. This book turns to social and cultural theory to more fully explore the deep connections between cultural production and human freedom.

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Most scholarship on intellectual property considers this law from the standpoint of law and economics. Under this conventional wisdom, intellectual property is simply a tool for promoting innovative products, from iPods to R2D2. In this highly original book Madhavi Sunder calls for a richer understanding of intellectual property law’s ...

Madhavi Sunder is professor of law at the University of California-Davis School of Law. She lives in Davis, CA.

other books by Madhavi Sunder

Format:HardcoverDimensions:272 pages, 9.25 × 6.13 × 0.98 inPublished:June 26, 2012Publisher:Yale University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:030014671X

ISBN - 13:9780300146714

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 "An imaginative reworking of the purpose and function of intellectual property law designed to go beyond efficiency and incentives to the plural values associated with freedom, equality, democracy, dignity, participatory culture, group formation, and simple joy. A pleasure to read with evocative examples of the ways the law can enable more of us to participate in collectively making meaning of our lives."—Joseph William Singer, Bussey Professor of Law, Harvard Law School