From Patriots to Unionists: Dublin Civic Politics and Irish Protestant Patriotism, 1660-1840 by Jacqueline HillFrom Patriots to Unionists: Dublin Civic Politics and Irish Protestant Patriotism, 1660-1840 by Jacqueline Hill

From Patriots to Unionists: Dublin Civic Politics and Irish Protestant Patriotism, 1660-1840

byJacqueline Hill

Hardcover | May 1, 1997

Pricing and Purchase Info

$320.39 online 
$510.00 list price save 37%
Earn 1602 plum® points
Quantity:

Ships within 1-3 weeks

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

Eighteenth-century Dublin contained the largest concentration of Protestants (c.70,000) in Ireland. Freemen of the guilds alone - who were entitled to a parliamentary vote - were almost as numerous as the entire landed class. These merchants, master craftsmen, and shopkeepers, most of themmembers of the established church, became firm supporters of the Patriot movement that culminated in the winning of legislative independence in 1782. Dr Jacqueline Hill draws on an extensive range of pamphlet and other sources, in order to examine the freemen's contribution to Irish Patriotism. She considers their challenge to oligarchy, their attitudes to Britain, and, crucially, their attitudes to Catholics. Offering the first detailedanalysis of the ideological nature of Irish Patriotism in its wider British, American, and European context, Dr Hill also provides a fresh perspective on the transformation of eighteenth-century Patriots into nineteenth-century Unionists.
Jacqueline Hill is a Senior Lecturer in History at St Patrick's College, Maynooth.
Loading
Title:From Patriots to Unionists: Dublin Civic Politics and Irish Protestant Patriotism, 1660-1840Format:HardcoverDimensions:464 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 1.18 inPublished:May 1, 1997Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198206356

ISBN - 13:9780198206354

Reviews

Editorial Reviews

`This book makes a valuable contribution to eighteenth and nineteeth-century Irish historiography. This is a richly detailed, meticulously researched, immaculately produced monograph. The narrative and social and economic contextualizations are surefooted. The emphasis on corporatist valuesand confessional ethos is both fresh and suggestive.'Jim Smyth, Albion