From Playhouse to Printing House: Drama and Authorship in Early Modern England by Douglas A. BrooksFrom Playhouse to Printing House: Drama and Authorship in Early Modern England by Douglas A. Brooks

From Playhouse to Printing House: Drama and Authorship in Early Modern England

byDouglas A. Brooks

Paperback | December 14, 2006

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This original study examines how Shakespeare and his contemporaries made the difficult transition from writing plays for the theater to publishing them as literary works. Douglas Brooks analyzes how and why certain plays found their way into print while many others failed to do so and looks at the role played by the Renaissance book trade in shaping literary reputations. Incorporating many finely-observed typographical illustrations, this book focuses on plays by Shakespeare, Jonson, Webster, and Beaumont and Fletcher as well as reviewing the complicated publication history of Thomas Heywood's work.
Title:From Playhouse to Printing House: Drama and Authorship in Early Modern EnglandFormat:PaperbackDimensions:316 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.71 inPublished:December 14, 2006Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521034868

ISBN - 13:9780521034869

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Table of Contents

List of illustrations; Preface; Acknowledgements; Prologue 'Thou grewst to govern the whole Stage alone': dramas of authorship in early modern England; 1. 'A toy brought to the Presse': marketing printed drama in early modern London; 2. 'So disfigured with scrapings & blotting out': Sir John Oldcastle and the construction of Shakespeare's authorship; 3. 'If he be at his book, disturb him not': the two Jonson folios of 1616; 4. 'What strange Production is at last displaid': dramatic authorship and the dilemma of collaboration; 5. 'So wronged in beeing publisht': Thomas Heywood and the discourse of perilous publication; Epilogue 'Why not Malevole in folio with vs': the after-birth of the author; Notes; Bibliography; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"A fine addition to Cambridge's Studies in Renaissance Literature and Culture." Studies in English Literature