From Slavery To Poverty: "the Racial Origins Of Welfare In New York, 1840-1918" by Gunja SenguptaFrom Slavery To Poverty: "the Racial Origins Of Welfare In New York, 1840-1918" by Gunja Sengupta

From Slavery To Poverty: "the Racial Origins Of Welfare In New York, 1840-1918"

byGunja Sengupta

Paperback | November 1, 2010

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The racially charged stereotype of "welfare queen"—an allegedly promiscuous waster who uses her children as meal tickets funded by tax-payers—is a familiar icon in modern America, but as Gunja SenGupta reveals in From Slavery to Poverty, her historical roots run deep. For, SenGupta argues, the language and institutions of poor relief and reform have historically served as forums for inventing and negotiating identity.

Mining a broad array of sources on nineteenth-century New York City’s interlocking network of private benevolence and municipal relief, SenGupta shows that these institutions promoted a racialized definition of poverty and citizenship. But they also offered a framework within which working poor New Yorkers—recently freed slaves and disfranchised free blacks, Afro-Caribbean sojourners and Irish immigrants, sex workers and unemployed laborers, and mothers and children—could challenge stereotypes and offer alternative visions of community. Thus, SenGupta argues, long before the advent of the twentieth-century welfare state, the discourse of welfare in its nineteenth-century incarnation created a space to talk about community, race, and nation; about what it meant to be “American,” who belonged, and who did not. Her work provides historical context for understanding why today the notion of "welfare"—with all its derogatory “un-American” connotations—is associated not with middle-class entitlements like Social Security and Medicare, but rather with programs targeted at the poor, which are wrongly assumed to benefit primarily urban African Americans.

Title:From Slavery To Poverty: "the Racial Origins Of Welfare In New York, 1840-1918"Format:PaperbackDimensions:349 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.68 inPublished:November 1, 2010Publisher:NYU PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:081474107X

ISBN - 13:9780814741078

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Editorial Reviews

“SenGupta's finely crafted study of post-slavery poverty in New York City gives a much higher level of understanding of the plight and courage of African Americans in the metropolis. By illuminating the tough economics of black life in nineteenth-century New York, she adds much-needed breadth to contemporary debate over how slavery affects the conditions of urban African Americans today.”-Graham Russell Gao Hodges,author of Root and Branch: African Americans in New York and East Jersey, 1613-1863