From the Kitchen to the Parlor: Language and Becoming in African American Womens Hair Care

Paperback | May 4, 2006

byLanita Jacobs-Huey

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When is hair "just hair" and when is it not "just hair"? Documenting the politics of African American women's hair, this multi-sited linguistic ethnography explores everyday interaction in beauty parlors, Internet discussions, comedy clubs, and other contexts to illuminate how and why hairmatters in African American women's day-to-day experiences.

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When is hair "just hair" and when is it not "just hair"? Documenting the politics of African American women's hair, this multi-sited linguistic ethnography explores everyday interaction in beauty parlors, Internet discussions, comedy clubs, and other contexts to illuminate how and why hairmatters in African American women's day-to-day ...

Lanita Jacobs-Huey is Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology and co-affiliated with the Program in American Studies and Ethnicity at the University of Southern California.

other books by Lanita Jacobs-Huey

Format:PaperbackDimensions:200 pages, 6.1 × 9.09 × 0.59 inPublished:May 4, 2006Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195304160

ISBN - 13:9780195304169

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Table of Contents

Introduction: From the Kitchen to the Parlor1. Negotiating Expert and Novice Identities through Client-stylist Interactions2. "We Are Like Doctors": Socializing Cosmetologists into the Discourse of Science3. A License to Touch: Cosmetology as a Divine Calling4. Gender, Authenticity, and Hair in African American Stand-up Comedy5. "BTW, How Do You Wear Your Hair?": Gender and Race in Computer-mediated Hair Debates6. Constructing and Contesting Knowledge in Women's Cross-cultural Hair Testimonies7. Critical Reflections on Language, Gender, and "Native" AnthropologyAppendix: Transcription Conventions

Editorial Reviews

"Linguistic anthropologist Lanita Jacobs-Huey is staking her claim as the Zora Neale Hurston of African American hair care research, immersing herself as participant observer in the culture of Black cosmetology. Combining childhood experiences as a cosmetologist's daughter with training as akeen-eyed scholar, she deciphers the emotionally nuanced, politically charged language of hair and its often contradictory interpretations in the Black community. From Internet chat rooms to hair weaving seminars, she searches the complex continuum between 'kitchen beauticians' and 'hair doctors,'all the while delving into the mix of science, religion, health, and beauty that creates the underpinnings for verbal and non-verbal negotiations about hair among African American women."--A'Lelia Bundles, Author, On Her Own Ground: The Life and Times of Madam C. J. Walker