From the Natural Man to the Political Machine: Sovereignty and Power in the Works of Thomas Hobbes by Gabriela RatuleaFrom the Natural Man to the Political Machine: Sovereignty and Power in the Works of Thomas Hobbes by Gabriela Ratulea

From the Natural Man to the Political Machine: Sovereignty and Power in the Works of Thomas Hobbes

byGabriela Ratulea

Hardcover | July 9, 2015

Pricing and Purchase Info

$39.41 online 
$55.85 list price save 29%
Earn 197 plum® points

Prices and offers may vary in store

Quantity:

Ships within 1-3 weeks

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

It is unusual to connect Thomas Hobbes’s political philosophy with liberal thought. This study argues that liberal philosophy is indeed indebted to Hobbes: as a modern thinker he was the first to deduce political rights and obligations from self-interest. While we may say today that Hobbes sustains the capacity of government at the expense of democratic institutions, it is equally clear that he invented the idea of political legitimacy in the modern sense. Analyzing the tradition of natural law, the doctrine of social contract, and the sources of moral and political obligation, the study shows how Hobbes’ assumptions help us to understand that there is no liberty without political authority.
Gabriela Ratulea is Associate Professor at the Department of Social Sciences and Communication, Transilvania University of Brasov (Romania). Her main research interests are political philosophy and social justice.
Loading
Title:From the Natural Man to the Political Machine: Sovereignty and Power in the Works of Thomas HobbesFormat:HardcoverDimensions:8.27 × 5.83 × 0.98 inPublished:July 9, 2015Publisher:Peter Lang GmbH, Internationaler Verlag der WissenschaftenLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:3631665504

ISBN - 13:9783631665503

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

Table of Contents

Contents: Natural law and natural right – Natural condition of mankind – State of nature and sovereignty – Thomas Hobbes’s doctrine of social contract – Hobbes’s theory of moral and political obligation – Natural laws as moral precepts – Liberal interpretation of Hobbes – Modern individualism.