From Underdogs to Tigers: The Rise and Growth of the Software Industry in Brazil, China, India…

Hardcover | February 15, 2005

EditorAshish Arora, Alfonso Gambardella

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In 1980 the Indian software industry was practically non-existent. By the 1990s the industry was one of the largest employers in manufacturing. Similar patterns of growth can be found in other emerging economies. So given that the software industry is commonly viewed as a high-tech industry,how is it that such spectacular growth has occurred in countries where high-tech industries would not seem likely to develop?This book examines the reasons behind this phenomenon, and asks whether it suggests a new model of economic development. The contributors explore the implications of the rise of these newcomers to the software market for the global industry, and whether there are things to be learnt about the roleof human capital in economic growth, firm formation and capabilities, business and managerial models, and industry structure.Chapters include country studies on Brazil, China, India, Ireland, and Israel, and are complemented by cross-cutting chapters on some of the key issues highlighted by the growth patterns of software in these nations, most notably the role of the multinational companies, the globalization of theskilled worker flows, and the formation of firm capabilities. The novelty of the growth patterns in the regions that studied makes this book useful for understanding analytical and empirical issues underlying new microfoundations of economic growth in some emerging regions of the world.

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From the Publisher

In 1980 the Indian software industry was practically non-existent. By the 1990s the industry was one of the largest employers in manufacturing. Similar patterns of growth can be found in other emerging economies. So given that the software industry is commonly viewed as a high-tech industry,how is it that such spectacular growth has oc...

Ashish Arora is Associate Professor of Economics and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University, PIttsburgh. He Is also co-director of the Software Industry Center at Carnegie Mellon University, funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and co-director of the Sustainable Computing Consortium at Carnegie Mellon University. He is co-au...
Format:HardcoverDimensions:328 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.92 inPublished:February 15, 2005Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199275602

ISBN - 13:9780199275601

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Table of Contents

1. Ashish Arora and Alfonso Gambardella: Introduction2. Ted Tschang and Lan Xue: The Chinese Softward Industry: The Implications of a Changing Domestic Market for Software Enterprises3. Antonio J. Junqueira Botelho, Giancarlo Stefaunto, and Francisco Veloso: The Brazilian Software Industry4. Suma Athreye: The Indian Software Industry5. Anita Sands: The Irish Software Industry6. Dan Breznits: The Israeli Software Industry7. Devesh Kapur and John McHale: Sojourns and Software: Internationally Mobile Human Capital and High-Tech Industry Development in India, Ireland, and Israel8. Marco Giarratana, Alessandro Pagano, and Salvatore Torrisi: The Role of the Multinational Companies9. Ashish Arora, Alfonso Gambardella, and Steven Klepper: Firm Formation and Firm Capabilities in the Rise of New Industries: Software, Auto, and TV in Different Regions and at Different Times10. Ashish Arora and Alfonso Gambardella: Bridging the Gap: Conclusions

Editorial Reviews

`...the strength of the book lies in the three thematic chapters that bring together the country experiences to study the industry evolution, and the role played by migration and multinational corporations in this industry: these should be essential reading for all development economists andpolicy makers.'The Economic Journal