Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: An Introduction to Methods

Paperback | May 28, 2003

EditorPeter Jezzard, Paul M Matthews, Stephen M Smith

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This book provides a comprehensive introduction to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the scanning technique which allows the mapping of active processes within the brain. There are six sections to the book with chapters from an expert international team. Part I provides a broad overview of the field and sets the context. Part II describes the physiological and physical background to fMRI, including coverage of the hardware required and pulse sequence selection.Practical issues involving experimental design of the paradigms, psycho-physical stimulus delivery and subject response are covered in Part III, followed by a comprehensive treatment of data analysis in Part IV. Part V deals with practical applications of the technique in the field of neuroscienceand in clinical practice. The final section describes how fMRI can be integrated with other neuro-electromagnetic functional mapping techniques. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: An Introduction to Methods is written to be accessible to a wide-ranging audience of research scientists interested in studying how the normal brain works, and clinicians interested in monitoring disease states and processes.

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This book provides a comprehensive introduction to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the scanning technique which allows the mapping of active processes within the brain. There are six sections to the book with chapters from an expert international team. Part I provides a broad overview of the field and sets the context. ...

Peter Jezzard is Head of MR Physics, FMRIB Centre, Dept of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford. Paul M Matthews is Director, FMRIB Centre, Dept of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford. Stephen Smith is Head of Image Analysis, FMRIB Centre, Dept of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford.
Format:PaperbackDimensions:408 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.98 inPublished:May 28, 2003Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:019852773X

ISBN - 13:9780198527732

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Table of Contents

Part I: Introduction1. Matthews: An introduction to fMRI of the brainPart II: Physics and Physiology2. Gjedde: Brain energy metabolism and the physiological basis of the haemodynamic response3. Jezzard and Clare: Principles of nuclear magnetic resonance and MRI4. Jones, Brookes and Moonen: Ultra-fast MRI5. Glover: Hardware for functional MRI6. Bandettini: Selection of the optimal pulse sequence for functional MRI7. Menon and Goodyear: Spatial and temporal resolution in fMRI8. Hoge and Pike: Quantitative measurement using fMRIPart III: Experimental Design9. Donaldson and Buckner: Effective paradigm design10. Savoy: The scanner as a psychophysical laboratoryPart IV: Analysis of Functional Imaging Data11. Smith: Overview of fMRI analysis12. Smith: Preparing fMRI data for statistical analysis13. Brammer: Head motion and its correction14. Worsley: Statistical analysis of activation images15. Jenkinson and Smith: Registration, brain atlases and cortical flattening16. Buchel and Friston: Extracting brain connectivityPart V: fMRI Applications17. Owen, Epstein and Johnsrude: fMRI applications in cognitive neuroscience18. Thulborn and Gisbert: Clinical applications of mapping neurocognitive processes in the human brain with fMRIPart VI: Integrating Technologies19. George, Schmidt, Rector and Wood: Dynamic functional neuroimaging integrating multiple modalities

Editorial Reviews

`... well written and should find a prominent place in the cubicles of aspiring and established fMRI researchers... Jezzard's book covers the broad range of topics most useful to a neuroscientist, from low-level to high-level.'Nature Neuroscience, May 2002