Functions: New Essays in the Philosophy of Psychology and Biology

Paperback | July 1, 2002

EditorAndre Ariew, Robert Cummins, Mark Perlman

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Robert Cummins is Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, Davis Mark Perlman is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Western Oregon University Andre Ariew is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the University of Rhode Island
Format:PaperbackDimensions:458 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.94 inPublished:July 1, 2002Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199255814

ISBN - 13:9780199255818

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Table of Contents

Andre Ariew and Mark Perlman: IntroductionHistory of Teleology and functional explanation: from Socrates to Darwin and Beyond1. Andre Ariew: Platonic and Aristotelian Roots of Teleological Arguments in Cosmology and Biology2. Michael Ruse: Evolutionary Biology and Teleological ThinkingAnalysis: Functional Explanations Today3. Christopher Boorse: A Rebuttal on Functions4. Ruth Millikan: Biofunctions: Two Paradigms5. Valerie Gray Hardcastle: On the Normativity of Functions6. Robert Cummins: Neo-Teleology7. William Wimsatt: Functional Organization, Analogy, and Inference8. David J. Buller: Function and Design Revisited9. Peter H. Schwartz: The Continuing Usefulness Account of Proper FunctionTeleosemantics10. Mark Perlman: Pagan Teleology: Adaptational Role and the Philosophy of Mind11. Berent Enc: Indeterminacy of Function Attributions12. D. M. Walsh: Brentano's ChestnutsRelated Issues13. Mohan Matthen: Human Rationality and the Unique Origin Constraint14. Colin Allen: Real Traits, Real Functions?15. Karen Neander: Types of Traits: Function, structure, and homology in the classification of traitsBiographies, Index

Editorial Reviews

`a richly varied collection of essays which ... provides the reader with the opportunity for a sustained examination of the central issues concerning functions and their role in biology and psychology'Graham Macdonald, Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews