Gender, Race, and the Writing of Empire: Public Discourse and the Boer War by Paula  M. KrebsGender, Race, and the Writing of Empire: Public Discourse and the Boer War by Paula  M. Krebs

Gender, Race, and the Writing of Empire: Public Discourse and the Boer War

byPaula M. KrebsEditorGillian Beer

Paperback | August 26, 2004

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This book looks at the ways Victorian ideas about gender and race supported British imperialism at the turn of the century. It examines the Boer War of 1899-1902 through the war writings of literary figures such as Arthur Conan Doyle, Olive Schreiner, H. Rider Haggard and Rudyard Kipling, and also through newspapers, propaganda, and other forms of public debate in print. Paula M. Krebs' analysis of the part played by ideas about gender and race in public discourse makes a significant new contribution to the study of British imperialism.

Details & Specs

Title:Gender, Race, and the Writing of Empire: Public Discourse and the Boer WarFormat:PaperbackDimensions:220 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.51 inPublished:August 26, 2004Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521607728

ISBN - 13:9780521607728

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Table of Contents

1. The war at home; 2. The concentration camps controversy and the press; 3. Gender ideology as military policy - the camps, continued; 4. Cannibals or knights: sexual honor in the propaganda of Arthur Conan Doyle and W. T. Stead; 5. Interpreting South Africa to Britain: Olive Schreiner, Boers, and Africans; 6. The imperial imaginary: the press, empire, and the literary figure; Notes; Works cited.

Editorial Reviews

"...the book is unique in analyzing several genres, and should be relevant to those intersted in how discourse creates and mirrors public understanding of conflict in times of rapid cultural change." Victorian Periodicals Review