Gendered Persona and Poetic Voice: The Abandoned Woman in Early Chinese Song Lyrics by Maija Bell SameiGendered Persona and Poetic Voice: The Abandoned Woman in Early Chinese Song Lyrics by Maija Bell Samei

Gendered Persona and Poetic Voice: The Abandoned Woman in Early Chinese Song Lyrics

byMaija Bell Samei

Hardcover | October 27, 2004

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Gendered Persona and Poetic Voice considers the effects on poetic voice of a conventional feminine persona, the abandoned woman, in early Chinese song lyric (ci) poems. The author reads the literary cross-dressing and ventriloquism of these mostly male-authored poems in light of the highly indeterminate Chinese poetic language. This study of persona and poetic voice will benefit scholars of lyric poetry in any language.
Maija Bell Samei received her Ph.D. in Chinese Literature from the University of Michigan.
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Title:Gendered Persona and Poetic Voice: The Abandoned Woman in Early Chinese Song LyricsFormat:HardcoverDimensions:220 pages, 9.24 × 6.5 × 0.87 inPublished:October 27, 2004Publisher:Lexington BooksLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0739107127

ISBN - 13:9780739107126

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Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Introduction: Voice, Persona, and Gendered Convention: Who is Speaking? Chapter 2 "A thousand, ten thousand resentments": The Story of a Convention Chapter 3 Magpies, Waterclocks, and Lies: "Images" of Voice Chapter 4 The Abandoned Woman as Object, Topos, and Ventriloquist's Puppet Chapter 5 Conclusion

Editorial Reviews

Gendered Persona and Poetic Voice is the first sustained study of the historical development and manipulation of the abandoned woman figure in early Chinese poetic genres, the song lyric in particular. Engaging with contemporary theories of performance and poetics, Dr. Bell Samei's many nuanced and insightful analyses of this feminine figure, in examples drawn from both popular and literati poetic traditions, introduce challenging perspectives on critical issues of gender, voice, and persona. An invaluable contribution to the fields of Chinese and comparative literature and gender studies.