Genetic Justice: DNA Data Banks, Criminal Investigations, and Civil Liberties

Kobo ebook | June 1, 2010

bySheldon Krimsky, Tania Simoncelli

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National DNA databanks were initially established to catalogue the identities of violent criminals and sex offenders. However, since the mid-1990s, forensic DNA databanks have expanded in some states and nations to include all people who have been arrested, regardless of whether they've been charged or convicted of a crime. The public is largely unaware of these changes and the advances in biotechnology and forensic DNA science that have made them possible, but we are beginning to realize that the unfettered collection of DNA profiles from innocent citizens has compromised our basic freedoms and rights.

Two prominent advisors on medical ethics, science policy, and civil liberties take a hard look at how the United States, Australia, Japan, and European countries have balanced the use of DNA databanks in criminal justice with the privacy rights of their citizenry. Sheldon Krimsky and Tania Simoncelli analyze the constitutional, ethical, and sociopolitical implications of expanded DNA collection in the United States and compare these findings to trends in other locations. They examine the development of legal precedent for taking DNA from juveniles, searching DNA databases for possible family members of suspects, conducting "DNA dragnets" of large local populations, and the warrantless acquisition by police of so-called abandoned DNA as they search for suspects. Most intriguing, Krimsky and Simoncelli explode the myth that DNA profiling is infallible, which has profound implications for criminal justice.

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National DNA databanks were initially established to catalogue the identities of violent criminals and sex offenders. However, since the mid-1990s, forensic DNA databanks have expanded in some states and nations to include all people who have been arrested, regardless of whether they've been charged or convicted of a crime. The public ...

Sheldon Krimsky is professor of urban and environmental policy and planning and adjunct professor of public health and community medicine at Tufts University. He is author or coeditor of eleven books, most recently Race and the Genetic Revolution: Science, Myth, and Culture.Tania Simoncelli worked for more than six years as the Scien...

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Format:Kobo ebookPublished:June 1, 2010Publisher:Columbia University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0231517807

ISBN - 13:9780231517805

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Extra Content

Table of Contents

Foreword
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Part I: DNA in Law Enforcement
1. Forensic DNA Analysis
2. The Network of U.S. DNA Data Banks
3. Community DNA Dragnets
4. Familial DNA Searches
5. Forensic DNA Phenotyping
6. Surreptitious Biological Sampling
7. Exonerations
8. The Illusory Appeal of a Universal DNA Data Bank
Part II: Comparative Systems
9. The United Kingdom
10. Japan's Forensic DNA Data Bank
11. Australia
12: Germany
13. Italy
Part III: Critical Perspectives
14. Privacy and Genetic Surveillance
15. Racial Disparities in DNA Data Banking
16. Fallibility in DNA Identification
17. The Efficacy of DNA Data Banks
18. Toward a Vision of Justice
Appendix: A Comparison of DNA Databases in Six Nations
Notes
Selected Readings
Index

Editorial Reviews

I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in and concerned about the balance between the protection of rights such as privacy and autonomy and public safely and criminal justice imperatives...