Gentzen's Centenary: The Quest for Consistency by Reinhard KahleGentzen's Centenary: The Quest for Consistency by Reinhard Kahle

Gentzen's Centenary: The Quest for Consistency

byReinhard KahleEditorMichael Rathjen

Paperback | November 9, 2015

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Gerhard Gentzen has been described as logic's lost genius, whom Gödel called a better logician than himself. This work comprises articles by leading proof theorists, attesting to Gentzen's enduring legacy to mathematical logic and beyond. The contributions range from philosophical reflections and re-evaluations of Gentzen's original consistency proofs to the most recent developments in proof theory. Gentzen founded modern proof theory. His sequent calculus and natural deduction system beautifully explain the deep symmetries of logic. They underlie modern developments in computer science such as automated theorem proving and type theory.   

Title:Gentzen's Centenary: The Quest for ConsistencyFormat:PaperbackDimensions:561 pagesPublished:November 9, 2015Publisher:Springer-Verlag/Sci-Tech/TradeLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:3319101021

ISBN - 13:9783319101026

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Gerhard Gentzen has been described as logic's lost genius, whom Gödel called a better logician than himself. This work comprises articles by leading proof theorists, attesting to Gentzen's enduring legacy to mathematical logic and beyond. The contributions range from philosophical reflections and re-evaluations of Gentzen's original consistency proofs to the most recent developments in proof theory. Gentzen founded modern proof theory. His sequent calculus and natural deduction system beautifully explain the deep symmetries of logic. They underlie modern developments in computer science such as automated theorem proving and type theory.