Geometrical Optics and Optical Design

Hardcover | February 1, 1993

byPantazis Mouroulis, John Macdonald

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This book is an up to date, introductory treatment of geometrical optics, from the point of view of the future optics practitioner. The principles of gaussian optics and first-order layout and design are emphasized, based on the tracing of two paraxial rays and the associated opticalinvariant. The radiometry of lens systems is seen to rest on the same concepts. Third order aberration theory is developed in detail. Complete examples of third order design are provided, together with software tools that allow the reader to follow the examples in detail, or to develop otherexamples independently. Throughout the book, the understanding of fundamental principles is given preference over the mere following of recipes. Several problems at the end of each chapter allow the student to practice and extend the concepts taught. In addition to Gaussian optics and aberrations,the basic principles of several types of optical instruments and components are treated, including gradient index and diffractive optics. A complete yet simple treatment of gaussian beams is included, that is also based on two paraxial rays and the optical invariant. The book concludes with anoutline of the optical design process and solved design problems.

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From Our Editors

Geometrical Optics and Optical Design is an up-to-date introductory treatment of geometrical optics which is intended to lead students toward the modern practices of computer-aided optical design. The principles of Gaussian optics and first-order layout and design are emphasized, based on the tracing of two paraxial rays and the associ...

From the Publisher

This book is an up to date, introductory treatment of geometrical optics, from the point of view of the future optics practitioner. The principles of gaussian optics and first-order layout and design are emphasized, based on the tracing of two paraxial rays and the associated opticalinvariant. The radiometry of lens systems is seen to ...

From the Jacket

Geometrical Optics and Optical Design is an up-to-date introductory treatment of geometrical optics which is intended to lead students toward the modern practices of computer-aided optical design. The principles of Gaussian optics and first-order layout and design are emphasized, based on the tracing of two paraxial rays and the associ...

Pantazis Mouroulis is at Rochester Institute of Technology. John Macdonald is at University of Reading.
Format:HardcoverDimensions:368 pages, 9.49 × 6.26 × 0.91 inPublished:February 1, 1993Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195089316

ISBN - 13:9780195089318

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Table of Contents

Chapter 1: Rays and the Foundations of Geometrical Optics1.1. Waves, wavefronts, and rays1.2. Propagaton of wavefronts, reflection, refraction1.3. Fermat's principle1.4. Irradiance and the inverse-square law1.5. The basic postulates of geometrical opticsChapter 2: Review of Elementary Ray Optics2.1. Plane Surfaces2.2. Curved Surfaces: FocusingChapter 3: Imagery by a Single Surface and a Thins Lens3.1. The sign convention3.2. The paraxial approximation3.3. Imagery by a single surface3.4. Mirrors3.5. Imagery by a then lens3.6. Imagery of an extended object. Magnification.3.7. The one-component design problem3.8. Other types of magnificationChapter 4: Gaussian Optics4.1. The paraxial height and angle variables4.2. Paraxial raytracing for systems of many surfaces4.3. The Optical Invariant4.4. Principal planes4.5. Power and principal planes of a system of two separated components.4.6. Thick lenses: power and location of principal planes4.7. Nodal points, measurement of focal length4.8. Additional topics in Gaussian optics4.9. Summary of Gaussian optics4.10. The two-component design problemChapter 5: Putting it All Together5.1. Stops and pupils5.2. Significance and use of the Marginal and Pupil Rays5.3. Light flux transmission through optical systemsChapter 6: Gaussian Optics of Optical Instruments and Components6.1. The telescope6.2. The microscope6.3. Projection optics6.4. The eye6.5. Reflecting prisms6.6. Cylindrical and anamorphic optics6.7. Gradient index optics6.8. Diffractive opticsChapter 7: Introduction to Aberrations7.1. Chromatic Aberration7.2. Introduction to monochromatic aberrations7.3. The wave aberration function and classification of aberrationChapter 8: Computation of Primary Aberrations8.1. The Seidel aberration coefficients8.2. Astigmatism and field curvature8.3. Primary aberrations of a reflecting prism (plane parallel plates)8.4. Primary aberrations of a spherical mirrorChapter 9: Aberrations of a Thin Lens in Air9.1. Central aberrations (stop at the lens)9.2. Thin lens aberration with a remote stop9.3. The two- and three-component solution with fixed Sigma Kappa.Chapter 10: Optical Design10.1. The optical design process10.2. Making the system real: thickening, total aberration10.3. Design example: operating spectacles10.4. Optimisation10.5. Pupils and pupil imagery10.6. Aspherics10.7. A brief guide to optical design softwareAppendix 1: Matrix methods in paraxial opticsAppendix 2: Gaussian beam raytracingAppendix 3: Finite raytracingAppendix 4: Shift of focusAppendix 5: Two computer programsAppendix 6: Thin lens bending program

From Our Editors

Geometrical Optics and Optical Design is an up-to-date introductory treatment of geometrical optics which is intended to lead students toward the modern practices of computer-aided optical design. The principles of Gaussian optics and first-order layout and design are emphasized, based on the tracing of two paraxial rays and the associated optical invariant. The radiometry of lens systems is seen to rest on the same concepts. Third-order aberration theory is developed in detail. Complete examples of third-order design are provided, together with software tools that allow students to follow the examples in detail or to develop other examples independently. Several problems at the end of each chapter allow students to practice and extend the concepts taught.

Editorial Reviews

"Almost perfect for UG optics!"--Eustace Dereniak, University of Arizona